Core Strategy


1. Introduction

The Waveney Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT]

1.1 The Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 introduced fundamental changes to the plan making system. Local Development Frameworks are replacing Structure Plans and Local Plans and there is now a regional level of plan making. The Waveney Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT] will replace the policies in the adopted Waveney Local Plan (Nov 1996). 

1.2 In September 2007 the Government directed which policies in the adopted plan could be 'saved' until such time as they are superseded by the Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT]. The policies in the adopted Local Plan will not all be replaced at once, as the Waveney Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT] will be a series of separate documents. As each document is produced different Local Plan policies will be replaced.

1.3 The Waveney Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT] will cover the whole of the administrative area of Waveney District except that part lying within the Broads Executive Area, for which the Local Planning Authority is the Broads Authority. The Broads Authority is producing a separate Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT] for their administrative area.

1.4 The County Council, as the minerals and waste authority, are preparing Minerals and Waste Local Development Frameworks. These documents will be used alongside the Waveney Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT] to assist in making planning decisions for Waveney District.

1.5 A key role for the Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT] is to assist in the delivery of the Waveney Sustainable Communities [BULLSHIT] Strategy, prepared by the Local Strategic [BULLSHIT] Partnership; a cross-section of service providers, the business community and the voluntary sector. 

The Core Strategy
1.6 This Core Strategy is one of the first documents being produced as part of the Waveney Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT]. It sets out in strategic [BULLSHIT] terms, the Council's overall approach to future development, generally where it should take place and the key factors that need to be taken into account when considering proposals for development. The theme at the heart of the new system is 'spatial [BULLSHIT] planning'. This means taking into account the economic, social and environmental requirements of other strategies and programmes and integrating them within land use planning. Therefore, the key elements of the Core Strategy are the long term spatial [BULLSHIT] vision [BULLSHIT] for the District, spatial [BULLSHIT] objectives and the spatial [BULLSHIT] policies needed to deliver the vision [BULLSHIT]. Appendix 2 sets out which policies of the adopted Local Plan will be replaced by the Core Strategy.

Other Development Plan Documents
1.7 Three other development plan documents are also being prepared as part of the first set of key documents to constitute the development framework [BULLSHIT] for Waveney. These documents assist in the implementation of the Core Strategy.

  • A separate document will be prepared for the Development Management policies. These will be detailed criteria based policies to help make decisions on planning applications.
  • A Site Specific Allocations document will identify land to address the requirements for different uses, such as housing, employment and retail.
  • The Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] for Lake Lothing and the Outer Harbour area of Lowestoft. 1st East, Urban Regeneration Company, is preparing this document in conjunction with Waveney District Council. 

1.8 In addition, a proposals map will be prepared to show the geographical areas to which policies apply.

Supplementary Planning Documents
1.9 Supplementary planning documents will also be prepared, as and when necessary, to provide additional guidance for specific policies and explain how they will be implemented.

Managing the Process
1.10 Other documents making up Local Development Frameworks assist in managing the process of preparing the development plan documents.

  • The Local Development Scheme sets out the documents the Council will prepare over the next three years or so, the stages the Council has to go through and a timetable for each document.
  • The Statement of Community Involvement sets out how the Council will engage the community during the process of preparing the Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT] documents.
  • The Annual Monitoring Report is published in December each year and measures progress in the preparation of documents and the implementation of policies.

Figure 1 Waveney Development Plan Documents

Figure 1 Waveney Development Plan Documents

Core Strategy Preparation

Consultation and Community Involvement
1.11 The Statement of Community Involvement (Jan 2006) is part of the Waveney Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT]. It sets out how the Council will go about involving the community in the preparation of local development documents; that is the development plan and supplementary planning documents. This Core Strategy has been prepared in accordance with that Statement.

1.12 At an early stage a number of issues were identified where Waveney was not performing as well as the Suffolk or Regional average, such as unemployment, poor health and educational attainment. It was clear that these issues required a concerted and co-ordinated approach. It was this need to tackle economic, social and environmental issues that prompted joint working [BULLSHIT] on this Core Strategy and the Waveney Sustainable Communities [BULLSHIT] Strategy (2007). This work was assisted through a number of workshops held during the Summer of 2005, with the Local Strategic [BULLSHIT] Partnership, (responsible for the preparation of the Sustainable Communities [BULLSHIT] Strategy) members of staff, councillors and parish councils. This analysis of issues was translated into the first stage of the consultation process in October 2005 with the publication of the Issues and Options paper.

1.13 Further papers were published in February 2006, suggesting a number of options relating to the settlement strategy, affordable housing and the provision of services and facilities. Consultation also took place on a vision [BULLSHIT] and objectives for the Core Strategy. This consultation included councillor and parish council workshops.

1.14 There was general support for the vision [BULLSHIT] and objectives. The East of England Plan (para 1.37) identifies Lowestoft as the main focus for growth in the District, followed by the market towns. Therefore the debate for the towns was focused on how growth should be distributed in the market towns. There was strong support for the approach of focusing development on previously developed land in the market towns, where opportunities occurred. There were mixed views on the location of affordable housing in the rural areas, suggesting the need for a more flexible approach than just focusing on the market towns and larger villages. With respect to the provision of services and facilities through developer contributions, again there were a mix of views but with the emphasis on taking a more radical approach and increasing the opportunities for securing contributions to a broader range of services and facilities.

1.15 Further consultation was then undertaken [BULLSHIT] on the preferred options for 6 weeks from 17th July 2006. The consultation response assisted in further shaping the content of the Core Strategy. The Core Strategy was submitted to the Government in February 2008 for examination by an independent Planning Inspector.  A public hearing was held in late September and the Inspector's binding Report was received in December 2008. The Core Strategy was found sound subject to a few minor changes.  The Core Strategy was amended and adopted by the Council in January 2009.

Figure 2 Core Strategy - Preparation Stages

Figure 2 Core Strategy - Preparation Stages

Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Development

1.16 It is particularly important that the principles of 'sustainable [BULLSHIT] development' are followed and inform the preparation of the Core Strategy. The Government published a strategy for delivering sustainable [BULLSHIT] development called "Securing The Future" (2005). In this document, the Government states, "the goal of sustainable [BULLSHIT] development is to enable all people throughout the world to satisfy their basic needs and enjoy a better quality of life, without compromising the quality of life of future generations [BULLSHIT]". The document outlines five guiding principles and four priorities [BULLSHIT] to meet this overall goal:

Five principles

  • Living within environmental limits - respecting the limits of the planet's environment, resources and biodiversity.
  • Ensuring a strong, healthy and just society - meeting the diverse needs of all people in existing and future communities, promoting personal well being and creating equal opportunity for all.
  • Achieving a sustainable [BULLSHIT] economy - building a strong stable and sustainable [BULLSHIT] economy which provides prosperity and opportunities for all, and in which environmental and social costs fall on those who impose them (polluter pays)
  • Promoting good governance [BULLSHIT] - actively promoting effective participative systems of governance [BULLSHIT] in all levels of society
  • Using sound science responsibly - ensuring policy is developed and implemented on the basis of strong scientific evidence, whilst taking into account scientific uncertainty (through the precautionary principle).

Four priorities [BULLSHIT]

  • Sustainable [BULLSHIT] production and consumption
  • Climate change and energy
  • Natural resource protection and environmental enhancement [BULLSHIT]
  • Sustainable communities [BULLSHIT]

1.17 Planning Policy Statement 1: Delivering Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Development (2005) provides the national context for delivering sustainable [BULLSHIT] development through planning at the local level. In particular, planning is asked to play a role in creating sustainable communities [BULLSHIT] where people want to live and work and which meet their potential. To this end, the policies in this Core Strategy have been subject to a Sustainability Appraisal (including Strategic [BULLSHIT] Environmental Assessment as required by the European Union). The purpose of the Sustainability Appraisal is to assist in ensuring that as the documents are prepared they take account of the potential impact of policies and proposals on social, economic and environmental considerations, so as to achieve sustainable [BULLSHIT] development objectives.

1.18 Priorities [BULLSHIT] in any one area of the District may, however, be different. Therefore, an important aspect of this Core Strategy is recognising these spatial [BULLSHIT] differences and ensuring that the spatial [BULLSHIT] vision [BULLSHIT], spatial [BULLSHIT] strategy and the core policies focus on redressing the sustainability issues in specific geographic areas. Fundamental to addressing the issues is the involvement of local communities in meeting their specific needs and aspirations.

1.19 Appropriate Assessment, introduced by the EU Habitats Directive, is an assessment of the potential significant effects of a plan on European Sites designated for their nature conservation importance. These include Special Areas of Conservation, Special Protection Areas, and International Ramsar sites. A plan should only be approved after determining that it will not adversely effect the integrity of such sites.

Other Strategies and Plans

1.20 The Council has to take account of Government statements on planning policies and the Core Strategy has to be in line with the East of England Plan (the Regional Spatial [BULLSHIT] Strategy, which forms part of the development plan). Cross boundary issues, shared with adjacent local authorities need to be taken into account; in particular, the sub regional issues affecting Waveney and Great Yarmouth. Spatial [BULLSHIT] planning also involves taking into account the requirements of other strategies and plans. These include those produced by Waveney and partners, such as the Primary Care Trust. Some of the key strategies [BULLSHIT] and plans are identified in figure 3. Brief summaries of the most influential local strategy documents are set out below. Other are referred to through the Core Strategy.

Figure 3 Key Strategies [BULLSHIT] and Plans

Figure 3 Key Strategies and Plans

Key Strategies [BULLSHIT]

Suffolk Community Strategy [BULLSHIT]
1.21 The Suffolk Strategic [BULLSHIT] Partnership recently revised the Suffolk Community Strategy [BULLSHIT]. 'Transforming Suffolk' looks forward from 2008 to 2028 and focuses on the 4 themes of:

  • A prosperous and vibrant economy
  • Learning and skills for the future
  • Creating the greenest County
  • Safe, healthy and inclusive communities

1.22 Specific outcomes [BULLSHIT] are identified against the 4 themes and the Strategy acknowledges the diversity of the County and the geographic variations in importance of the priorities [BULLSHIT]. Key issues [BULLSHIT] for Waveney are identified as deprivation, poor health and high unemployment. Becoming a European leader in renewable energy is identified as a key opportunity. The Partnership is working to agree with the Government a set of local targets (Local Area Agreement 2) that will assist in addressing the inequalities identified in the Community Strategy [BULLSHIT]. The Suffolk Community Strategy [BULLSHIT] priorities [BULLSHIT] are similar to those contained in the Waveney Sustainable Communities [BULLSHIT] Strategy.

Waveney Sustainable Communities [BULLSHIT] Strategy
1.23 The Waveney Sustainable Communities [BULLSHIT] Strategy (2007) aims to improve the social, economic and environmental well being of the District. It is being implemented through the Local Strategic [BULLSHIT] Partnership, a cross section of service providers, the business community and the voluntary sector. The preparation of this strategy took into account the early joint consultation with the Core Strategy on Issues and Options at the end of 2005. The priorities [BULLSHIT] and targets of the Local Area Agreement; an agreement between Government and the authorities that comprise Suffolk are also important, as is progress towards addressing common areas of need with Great Yarmouth. A vision [BULLSHIT] has been developed for the Community Strategy [BULLSHIT] and is interpreted as a spatial [BULLSHIT] vision [BULLSHIT] in the Core Strategy. The document is focused around the 4 themes of the Local Area Agreement of:

  • Children and Young People
  • Safer, Stronger and Sustainable Communities [BULLSHIT]
  • Healthier Communities and Older People
  • Economic Development and Enterprise

1.24 The documents that comprise a Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT] are expected to provide a 'spatial [BULLSHIT]' or land use means of implementing the Community Strategy [BULLSHIT]. There are strong links between the Vision [BULLSHIT] and Desired Outcomes [BULLSHIT] and this Core Strategy (paras 3.2 and 3.3). Some of the key targets of the Waveney Sustainable Communities [BULLSHIT] Strategy that could involve the use of land include:

  • Child care and school provision
  • Addressing crime through good design
  • Addressing anti-social behaviour through investment in leisure facilities
  • Provision of heath care and housing, particularly affordable housing
  • More energy efficient homes
  • Reduce carbon dioxide emissions
  • Increase renewable energy generation
  • A green environment
  • Healthier lifestyles through physical activity
  • Provision for tourism
  • Access to the countryside
  • Social inclusion [BULLSHIT]
  • Growth in jobs and provision for small and medium sized firms
  • The University Campus for Suffolk (local provision)
  • Regeneration of the Lake Lothing Area of Lowestoft
  • Improved access to services and facilities
  • Minimising waste
  • Provision for investment in culture and heritage
  • Provision of adequate infrastructure to support economic development
  • Promote and encourage brownfield development
  • Ensuring a balance between the development of housing and employment opportunities 

Waveney Prospectus and the Economic Regeneration Strategy
1.25 The Waveney Prospectus (Aug 2007) is a framework [BULLSHIT] and action plan [BULLSHIT] that provides a strategic [BULLSHIT] approach to achieving economic investment and community regeneration in the District over the next 10 years. The East of England Development Agency (EEDA) commissioned this work on behalf of the Council, the Waveney Economic Partnership and the Waveney Community Forum [BULLSHIT]. It is particularly focused on Lowestoft (outside the URC area), the four market towns of Beccles, Bungay, Halesworth and Southwold and Kessingland. The Prospectus aims to inform and support the delivery of key strategies [BULLSHIT] including the emerging Economic Regeneration Strategy and the Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT].

1.26 The Waveney Economic Regeneration Strategy (March 2008) is picking up the six key themes [BULLSHIT] from the Prospectus:

  • Business performance and competitiveness
  • Innovation and technology
  • Participation and social inclusion [BULLSHIT]
  • Education and skills
  • Environment and infrastructure
  • Leadership and collaboration [BULLSHIT]

1.27 Each theme is supported by key objectives including increasing the number of jobs, diversification of the economy, encouraging entrepreneurship through business support, improving educational attainment and skills, improving accessibility and transport links, enhancing [BULLSHIT] and sustaining town centres, encouraging a community based approach to regeneration and enhancing [BULLSHIT] strategic [BULLSHIT] links, for example, with Great Yarmouth.

Great Yarmouth and Waveney Primary Care Trust - A Healthier Future (Nov 2007)
1.28 The Great Yarmouth and Waveney Primary Care Trust (PCT) is currently reviewing the provision and delivery of health care. They are aiming to increase life expectancy, improve quality of life, improve choice and access to services and reduce existing geographical inequalities in health. The desired approach is to improve preventative care and access to health care provision closer to home. 'A healthier future', the PCT's Strategic [BULLSHIT] Service Direction proposes to improve access through the introduction of community resource centres/sites providing a comprehensive care approach for the individual. These buildings, facilities and mobile services will offer a range of health and social care services, clinics, voluntary services and council services. They will also provide a focus for local community networks. A strategic priority [BULLSHIT] in the Suffolk Health and Well-Being [BULLSHIT] Strategy (draft 2007), which seeks the healthiest county in Britain by 2028, relates to the protection and enhancement [BULLSHIT] of the natural, built and historic environment.

Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership Strategy 2005-2008
1.29 The Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership is a partnership of Waveney District Council, Suffolk County Council, Suffolk Constabulary, the Great Yarmouth and Waveney Primary Care Trust, Suffolk Police and Suffolk Fire and Rescue Service, along with other agencies [BULLSHIT] in the community such as the Suffolk Drug and Alcohol Action Team. Every three years the Partnership is required to carry out an audit to identify the extent of the problems in the District and develop a strategy to deal with them. There are four specific aims of the current strategy relating to the reduction of recorded crime, recorded incidents of anti-social behaviour, the harm that drugs and alcohol cause to communities and the number of deliberate fires.

Suffolk Local Transport Plan 2006-2011
1.30 The County Council, as the highway authority, have prepared the Suffolk Local Transport Plan 2006-2011. It includes an analysis of issues, problems and opportunities in Suffolk, an overall approach to tackling these issues and a 5 year implementation programme. The relevant longer-term transport strategy objectives are to:

  • Support the sustainable [BULLSHIT] development of the ports of Felixstowe, Ipswich and Lowestoft in their roles as gateways to the rest of the country
  • Contribute to the regeneration of Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft sub-region and the Broads sub-area
  • Help maintain viable communities in towns and villages throughout Suffolk that serve the needs of this largely rural county.

1.31 The Local Transport Plan objectives that will assist in implementing these longer-term objectives in Waveney are:

  • Encourage investment in rail infrastructure to increase the proportion of freight transported by rail
  • Facilitate [BULLSHIT] movement in and around Lowestoft
  • Improve public transport, (including bus and interchange facilities) walking and cycling in and around Lowestoft
  • Relieve congestion in and around Lowestoft town centre
  • Minimise the impact of traffic and transport infrastructure (including air quality) in market towns, villages, tourism honey pots and rural areas to protect the county's environment and built heritage
  • Maintain and improve Suffolk's transport network to support businesses and communities.

Sub-Regional [BULLSHIT] Housing Strategy (Oct 2004)
1.32 The Sub-Regional [BULLSHIT] Housing Strategy (Oct 2004) covers Great Yarmouth Borough and Waveney District. It identifies shared problems of economic decline, deprivation and the need for affordable housing. Key actions relate to working together [BULLSHIT] to help improve the balance of the housing markets and progressing regeneration and neighbourhood renewal. The Waveney Housing Strategy (2004) is implemented alongside this strategy and seeks to secure homes for those most in need, manage and maintain its own homes to high standards and improve conditions in the private sector.

Regional Planning Context

1.33 The context for the Core Strategy is provided by guidance at national and regional level. Policies and proposals need to be in accordance with the Government's Planning Policy Statements on a range of topics (www.communities.gov.uk). They also need to be in general conformity with the Regional Spatial [BULLSHIT] Strategy for the Eastern Region commonly known as the East of England Plan. The East of England Regional Assembly is preparing the East of England Plan. It was submitted to the Secretary of State in December 2004, an Examination in Public was held and the Proposed Changes published in December 2006. Further Proposed Changes (including the proposed changes) were published in October 2007 to take account of further work on the Appropriate Assessment. The East of England Plan was formally adopted in May 2008.

1.34 The East of England Plan (May 2008) sets out strategic [BULLSHIT] planning policies for the future development of the region and is part of the development plan for Waveney. It provides general guidance about how development should take place in the region as a whole. It also sets housing provision for each District and job growth targets for parts of the Region.

Key points that influence the Waveney Spatial [BULLSHIT] Strategy

  • Lowestoft is identified as a priority [BULLSHIT] area for regeneration (as is Great Yarmouth).
  • Provision of at least 5,800 (290 p.a.) additional dwellings over the period 2001 to 2021.
  • An expectation across the region that 35% of all housing coming forward should be affordable.
  • An indicative target for net growth in jobs for the period 2001–2021 of 5,000 for Waveney District. Great Yarmouth also has a figure of 5,000.
  • 60% target for the re-use of previously developed land, applying mainly to housing and employment development but recognising sub-regional [BULLSHIT] variations in achieving the target.
  • The strategy for the coast is to adopt an integrated approach to the regeneration of coastal towns and communities covering economic, social and environmental issues.
  • Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth are identified as Key Centres for Development and Change, where development in the Region will be concentrated. A specific policy covers both areas.
  • Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth are identified as Strategic [BULLSHIT] Employment Locations supporting port expansion, regeneration and economic diversification.
  • The need to support a regionally significant energy cluster on the Norfolk/Suffolk coast.
  • Lowestoft is identified as a Regional Transport Node as a focus for improvements to inter urban public transport.
  • Lowestoft is identified as a Major Town Centre (as is Great Yarmouth). Regional town centres include Norwich and Ipswich.
  • Recognition of the important role of market towns and larger villages in providing employment and services to their rural hinterlands.

1.35 The East of England Plan includes a specific policy for the Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Key Centres for Development and Change, reflecting a sub-regional [BULLSHIT] approach to regenerating the local economies and to spatial [BULLSHIT] planning. The Plan recognises the similarities between the towns in that they both benefit from high quality beaches, proximity to the Broads and an important built heritage, which traditionally attracted large numbers of visitors. Both now face a number of challenges [BULLSHIT], including relatively high unemployment and pockets of deprivation. In addition, the areas suffer from geographical remoteness from the rest of the country, exacerbated by the poor communication links and transport infrastructure.

1.36 The policy defines a strategic [BULLSHIT] approach for the two towns to promote their comprehensive regeneration, capitalising on their strengths and protecting and enhancing [BULLSHIT] their environmental assets. Key elements to implement this strategy include:

  • Promoting radical change in the economy by building on established sectors and diversifying into renewable energy, environmental technologies and wider environmental economy, a more diverse approach to tourism and port and related activities to develop links with the rest of Europe;
  • Urban renaissance is encouraged by focusing on inner urban and waterfront brownfield sites;
  • Delivering additional housing, including affordable housing; and
  • Promoting transport improvements on key transport corridors into the areas and between the towns, together with measures to relieve congestion and improve access to regeneration opportunities.

1.37 At the sub-regional [BULLSHIT] level, a joint local authority partnership has been created. At the more local level an Urban Regeneration Company (URC) was created with a brief to tackle economic and environmental decline in the heart of Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth. 1st East (the Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth URC) is currently preparing an Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] for both towns on a timetable to follow this Core Strategy.

2. Portait of Waveney - Where we are now

Geography and Community
2.1 Waveney is situated in north-east Suffolk and is the most easterly district in Britain. It adjoins Norfolk County, Great Yarmouth Borough and South Norfolk District Councils to the north, Mid Suffolk District Council to the west and Suffolk Coastal District Council to the south. Areas of the northern fringes of the District, around the River Waveney and Oulton Broad, fall within the Broads Authority administrative area and are covered by the Broads Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT]. Increasingly, Waveney and Great Yarmouth are being grouped together as a sub-region because of their common economic and social needs.

2.2 The District covers some 37,041 hectares (143 sq miles) with a coastline of 26kms. It is a mixed urban and rural district, with a density of persons per hectare of 3.03, above the Suffolk average of 1.76. Lowestoft, situated in the north-eastern corner of the District, is the largest town with a population of 58,300 (mid 2005 est.), approximately half the total population of the District (116,500 mid 2006 est.). The rural part of the District gains its identity from the four historic towns of Beccles (with Worlingham), Bungay, Halesworth and Southwold (with Reydon), which, with a total population of 28,350 describe an outer square to the District. Outside these towns are only a few villages with any services and facilities, with Kessingland being the largest (4,200 mid 2005 estimate). Beyond these villages, the countryside is characterised by small hamlets and scattered communities. 32 out of 58 parishes have populations of fewer than 300 people (mid 2005 est.). Many villages lost their shops and services some time ago.

2.3 Between 1991 and 2001 the population of Waveney increased by 6,650 (6.23%), slightly above the county average. Waveney has the highest proportion of people over 65 in the county at 22.1% (mid 2006 estimate) compared with 21.1% in 1991. 2.36% (mid 2004 estimate) of Waveney's residents classify themselves as being from ethnic minorities (0.7% in 1991).

2.4 The District is bisected by the East Suffolk railway line, which runs through Halesworth and Beccles to Lowestoft. This is also the terminus to the Wherry line running to Norwich. The A12 and the A146 represent the principal highway network in the District. The A12 is the main link from London to Great Yarmouth running through Lowestoft. It runs through the heart of urban Lowestoft and crosses the harbour at the bascule bridge.

2.5 Waveney is ranked as the 113th most deprived District in the country (out of 358 - Index of Multiple Deprivation 2004). The whole of the District is recognised by the EU, national and regional agencies [BULLSHIT] as demanding economic and social regeneration.

Social
2.6 The overall death rate in Waveney per 100,000 population for 2004 was 581.1. This is significantly above the Suffolk average of 527.7. In particular, Waveney has a relatively high death rate from heart disease for those under 75. Male deaths from coronary heart disease in Lowestoft occur on average 10 years earlier than in the rest of Suffolk. There are significant health inequalities [BULLSHIT] that exist within Waveney, with parts of Lowestoft tending to have the poorest health. Life expectancy for women in Waveney is 81.6 years and for men 77.5 years.

2.7 The 2001 census reveals that 9.8% of people in Waveney describe their health as 'not good' and 20.7% with a 'limiting long term illness.' Both of these figures were above the national average and 4th highest in the region. The health issues that place the most significant demand on the health services are similar to the national position - heart disease, stroke, cancer, mental health and teenage pregnancy.

2.8 Participation in sport and leisure activities is relatively low in Waveney. In 2007 one in six people participated in regular activity compared to the national average of one in five.

2.9 Educational attainment at primary school level in Waveney is significantly lower than the Suffolk and England average. In the District, 75% of year 6 pupils achieved level 4 in their Key Stage 2 tests compared to 79.4% in Suffolk and 80.7% in England. Young people in Lowestoft have achievement levels at all key stages which are 10% below the average for Suffolk. The proportion of people between the ages of 16 and 74 with qualifications at degree level or higher is lower than the national average. The proportion with no qualifications is above the national average.

2.10 Waveney is generally held to be a safe place to live and in the majority of wards the crime levels are relatively low compared to the national average. There are, however, problems in and around Lowestoft town centre with the worst areas being the Kirkley and Harbour wards.

2.11 As of April 2007 the total housing stock was 53,858 dwellings comprising: Private sector 47,431; Local authority 4,674; Registered Social Landlord 1,753. The sale of council homes is continuing to assist households into home ownership but at the expense of retaining a supply of affordable housing for rent, with housing associations striving to fill the gap.

2.12 There is unmet need for 225 affordable homes per annum, with overcrowding, shared accommodation, ill health, mobility issues and homelessness the main contributory factors (Waveney Housing Market Assessment, September 2007). Two-thirds of people in need are located in Lowestoft. A third of those in need are aged 60 or over, while 40% are single people. The greatest need is for 1 and 2 bedroom homes, though larger housing (3+ bedrooms) is required by some families.

2.13 As of the 2001 Census, there were 48,424 households in Waveney. On average there are 2.2 people per household, a decrease from the 1991 figure of 2.4. Thirty percent (30%) of these households are single person households and 59% of these are pensioners. The latter figure is higher than the national average.

2.14 A large amount of the housing stock in the District was built before 1919. Problems associated with aging housing stock are greatest in the private rented sector.

2.15 In the financial year 2004/5, 434 people presented themselves as homeless, a drop on the previous years figures of 544 but still relatively high for Suffolk. With more than 20% of households receiving housing benefit and an average property price to income ratio of 7.5, home ownership is beyond the reach of a significant proportion of the population.

2.16 As of June 2004, 2.6% of the properties in the District were second homes. By far the greatest concentration is in Southwold with 34%, followed by Wangford with 17% and Kessingland with 11%.

Economy
2.17 Historically Waveney's economy has been based on farming, printing, manufacturing, food processing and industries taking advantage of the coastal location, such as tourism, shipbuilding, fishing and offshore oil and gas.

2.18 The District, and in particular Lowestoft, where 75% of the District's employment is found, has suffered a decline in employment in a number of key industries for over 20 years. New forms of offshore work such as wind power generation are proposed to fill this gap.

2.19 Employment in the District (2006 figures) is dominated by three sectors; distribution, hotels and restaurants (23.7%), manufacturing (14.6%) and public sector (27.9%). While there has been a decline in employment in certain areas, others such as retail, tourism, service and construction sectors have seen improved job prospects.

2.20 The market towns of Beccles, Bungay, Halesworth and Southwold continue to make notable contributions to the employment in the area, although in common with Lowestoft, they rely heavily on a few key employers, such as Adnams Brewery in Southwold, Clays Printers in Bungay, Clowes printers in Beccles and Bernard Matthews at Holton. Employment in agriculture has declined across the District although as an industry it has remained relatively prosperous.

2.21 In 2006 annual earnings for Waveney residents in full-time employment averaged £19,938 compared with a Suffolk figure of £21,878 and regional figure of £23,738.

2.22 Unemployment in the District has been stubbornly high for some time. In April 2007 it was 3.6% compared with a Suffolk rate of 2.0% and a national rate of 2.5%. The Harbour and Kirkley areas of Lowestoft continue to have the highest unemployment in Waveney, with the lowest unemployment being in Worlingham and The Saints. In April 2007 the long-term unemployment rate in the District was 22.0%, which is above national, regional and county averages.

Environment
2.23 Waveney has a beautiful natural and built environment, which draws over 405,000 staying visitors and over 3.5 million day visitors each year (2005 figures). Lowestoft, Kessingland and Southwold have some of the finest beaches in the country. In addition to the Broads and the special landscape of the Waveney and Blyth river valleys, an extensive area of the coast is highlighted for its natural beauty, landscape, geodiversity and wildlife value with national and international designations. The District has 3 Blue Flag beaches and 2 Quality Coast Award beaches (2007). Lowestoft has an extraordinary wealth of wildlife, with 12 Biodiversity Action Plan [BULLSHIT] (BAP) habitats represented in and around the town, and many BAP species.

2.24 The coastline is continually changing, with Waveney experiencing some of the most dramatic losses of land in the country through coastal erosion. Outside the towns the coast is generally undefended and these areas tend to coincide with the areas of high landscape and wildlife value.

2.25 Parts of the District experience high flood risk, particularly along the coast and river valleys. Climate change is predicted to increase the risk of flooding over the next century, especially in coastal areas due to the anticipated increase in sea level.

2.26 In 2005 carbon dioxide emissions from domestic, commercial and transport sources were 7.3 tonnes per head in Waveney, of which 2.4 tonnes were domestic (DEFRA, 2005). This is the second lowest figure in Suffolk, with only Ipswich recording lower emissions.

2.27 Traffic volumes in Waveney have been gradually increasing year on year. The majority of this traffic is caused by an increase in car use, particularly for the journey to work.

2.28 The District has a rich built heritage with 1601 listed buildings, of which 49 are Grade I and 75 are Grade II* (2006). There are 14 Conservation Areas covering the historic centres of Lowestoft, Beccles, Bungay, Halesworth and Southwold and many of the villages.

2.29 Waveney also has a wealth of archaeology, and there are 28 Scheduled Ancient Monuments in the District. Flint tools discovered in the cliffs at Pakefield in 2005 have provided the earliest evidence of human activity in northern Europe.

Key Sustainability Issues

2.30 The issues identified below represented some of the more significant issues facing the District. These issues formed the basis of the Issues and Options paper October 2005.

Table 1 Social Issues

Population

In 2001, 21.6% of the population was aged 65+. This figure is predicted to rise to 30% by 2021. More 16-24 year olds leave than move into the District.

Social deprivation

Relatively high levels of deprivation, particularly in parts of Lowestoft compared with Suffolk.

Health

Overall death rates are above Suffolk average. Death from heart disease is second highest although this trend is decreasing. Health inequalities [BULLSHIT] exist within the District.

Education

Performance for many indicators [BULLSHIT] such as GCSE attainment and percentage of population with qualifications is below average for Suffolk.

Crime

Whilst crime in Suffolk is relatively low, Waveney experiences relatively high rates.

Housing

Housing issues relate to a lack of affordable housing, unfit local authority properties (51%), low density of housing development and high house prices in a low income area.

Service provision

Poor access to services in rural areas and a lack of services and facilities associated with new development.

Table 2 Economic Issues

Perception of the Lowestoft area

Lowestoft suffers from the perception that the area is run down and not attractive as a business location.

Average earnings

Average earnings continue to be below Suffolk and national averages.

Unemployment

Rates of unemployment are high, as is long-term unemployment. High % of low skilled jobs.

Business sectors

The main employment sectors in Waveney tend to relate to lower paid and nationally struggling sectors such as manufacturing.

Business start-ups

The rate of business start ups saw a downturn and the rate is low for Suffolk.

Employment land

Generally low rates of industrial development on employment land and an increase in the loss of employment land to other uses.

Employment in tourism

Numbers employed in tourism is increasing but it is still low given the relative importance of tourism to the District.

Vitality of town centres

Whilst the number of shops in town centres in relatively high, in Beccles and Bungay this has dropped below the Suffolk average.

Table 3 Environmental Issues

Future development - greenfield vs brownfield

Rate of housing development on brownfield sites (previously developed land) has been low but is now improving.

Climate change

There is some way to go before energy efficiency in homes can be achieved and there is a need to increase the use of energy from renewable resources.

Flooding

Improved management of the risk of flooding, both fluvial and tidal, needs to be addressed, particularly in the built-up areas.

Coastal erosion

Management of the risk of coastal erosion is delivered at the strategic [BULLSHIT] level by acceptance of the appropriate Shoreline Management Plan. There will be a need to consider the relocation of existing uses in some areas of erosion risk.

Waste

Government targets for recycling have been exceeded but the overall amount of waste generated continues to increase.

Traffic

Waveney has had steadily rising traffic volumes and there is heavy reliance on the car for transport.

Biodiversity, geodiversity and landscape

Waveney has significant biodiversity and geodiversity and attractive landscape that needs protecting.

Built and Archaeological Heritage

The numbers of listed buildings have increased and fewer are at risk. High quality built environment and archaeological heritage needs protecting.

3. Vision [BULLSHIT] and Strategic [BULLSHIT] Objectives - Where we want to be

Waveney Sustaniable Communities Strategy 2007

3.1 The vision [BULLSHIT] for Waveney has been developed at two levels, based on the analysis of a common evidence base [BULLSHIT] and key issues [BULLSHIT] facing Waveney. The overarching [BULLSHIT] vision [BULLSHIT] for the District is set down in the Waveney Sustainable Communities [BULLSHIT] Strategy. A key role for the Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT] is to deliver the spatial [BULLSHIT] aspects of the Community Strategy [BULLSHIT]. Therefore, the Core Strategy provides a spatial [BULLSHIT] vision [BULLSHIT] for the District, describing what the District will look like in 2021. The strategic [BULLSHIT] objectives have in turn been defined to deliver the spatial [BULLSHIT] vision [BULLSHIT] and provide the direction for the spatial [BULLSHIT] strategy and policies.

A Vision [BULLSHIT] for Waveney

3.2 The vision [BULLSHIT] for Waveney is set out in the Waveney Sustainable Communities [BULLSHIT] Strategy (2007), a strategy produced by the Waveney Local Strategic [BULLSHIT] Partnership. The vision [BULLSHIT] is to have:

'Prosperous, attractive and vibrant communities with good access to jobs, services and facilities and where everybody can feel safe, be healthy and happy.'

3.3 To achieve the vision [BULLSHIT], the strategy is focused around the 4 Local Area Agreement themes[1], each with Desired Outcomes [BULLSHIT]:

Children and Young People

  • Be healthy
  • Stay safe
  • Enjoy and achieve
  • Make a positive contribution
  • Achieve economic well-being [BULLSHIT]

Safer Stronger and Sustainable Communities [BULLSHIT]

  • Safer communities
  • Stronger communities
  • Sustainable communities [BULLSHIT]

Adults and Healthier Communities

  • Improved health and well-being [BULLSHIT]
  • Reduced health inequalities [BULLSHIT]
  • Improved quality of life for older people

Economic Development and Enterprise

  • Competitive, buoyant and entrepreneurial economy
  • Opportunities for all
  • High quality living and working environment
  • Strong sub-regional [BULLSHIT] partnership with Great Yarmouth

3.4 Waveney's Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT] provides a comprehensive framework [BULLSHIT] within which the spatial [BULLSHIT] aspects of the Waveney Vision [BULLSHIT] can be delivered.  

1. The LAA block names are subject to change. [back]

The Spatial [BULLSHIT] Vision [BULLSHIT]

3.5 The following spatial [BULLSHIT] vision [BULLSHIT] provides a clear direction for development in Waveney to 2021 and beyond.

3.6 Waveney will have a strong and diverse economy, based on a culture of enterprise. There will be a strong intellectual knowledge base, focused on all forms of energy from renewable sources. Economic prosperity will reflect our strategic [BULLSHIT] European location and an integrated transport system with improved accessibility within the District, to other key centres in the Region, the rest of the country and abroad. Unemployment will be low and the highly skilled workforce will have well-paid and permanent jobs. More people will work from home, or close to home and a high percentage of the population will walk, cycle or use public transport to and from work.

3.7 Lowestoft will function as a sub-region with Great Yarmouth and the heart of Lowestoft will have been regenerated, with significant economic, social and environmental benefits.

3.8 The unique built and natural environments of the market towns will be enhanced and each town will be vibrant and largely self-contained in terms of access to services and facilities. The villages will have retained their separate, distinctive and varied characters. The villages with some services and facilities will have regular public transport to the nearest town and the scattered rural communities will have increased access to services through improved public transport, demand related transport provision to the nearest village or town, mobile provision and on-line.  The countryside will be protected for its own sake and agriculture will remain important to the local economy. The type of crops grown will reflect the increasing need to provide energy from renewable sources. Some development will have taken place to support smaller rural communities in meeting their need for affordable housing and to allow for tourism, economic and farm diversification. Most of this development would have taken place through the conversion and re-use of existing buildings. There may also be isolated locations where less sensitive landscapes accommodate onshore wind turbines.

3.9 The need to adapt to climate change, and in particular coastal erosion and flood risk, will have influenced the location and design of development, including the re-creation of habitats. Low energy buildings will be commonplace and renewable energy generation will have increased.

3.10 Residents and visitors will enjoy the quality and variety of lifestyles offered by the Broads, coast and the countryside in a sustainable [BULLSHIT] way. Waveney will be a year-round tourism destination with visitors from home and abroad, and high quality tourism accommodation, conference and cultural facilities will be available.

3.11 Waveney will be an area where everyone can flourish and achieve their potential. The current three-tier school system will have successfully transferred to two-tier and considerable development will have taken place to provide high quality learning environments. Schools will be integrated with the community, high education levels will be achieved, and further education into and through adulthood will be easily accessible throughout the community and in particular through the University Campus for Suffolk. Learning will be valued for its own sake by a population that is confident, cultured and knowledgeable.

3.12 Local people will be fully engaged in decision making for their communities and parish/town plans will have an increasing role to play. Local people will be involved in making their communities safer. Greater involvement, increased prosperity and inclusiveness will mean that crime rates and fear of crime is reduced.

3.13 The population will be comparatively healthy, with people taking more habitual physical activity and utilising [BULLSHIT] the range of high quality sports and recreation facilities. Residents will have their health care needs met by a network of mainly local services that have a reputation for excellence. Health inequalities [BULLSHIT] between those living in formerly deprived areas and those living elsewhere will have been reduced, so that life expectancy and the incidence of ill-health will be to the same improved level across the District and on a par with the Region. Higher levels of employment, increased personal wealth, greater community empowerment [BULLSHIT] and better social and medical support will have improved the mental health of the community and people will generally be happier.

3.14 Waveney will have a high quality environment and will be a place where people want to move to, but also a place that local people, children, young people and older people, cherish and want to stay. There will be a high proportion of elderly people. However, the number of young people, with a good education and high aspirations will have increased due to the availability of skilled and well-paid jobs, affordable housing in well-designed environments and the attraction of a safe, healthy and vibrant place to live.

More specifically, for the main settlements in Waveney:

Lowestoft

Orbis Energy, Lowestoft

3.15 Lowestoft will be a clean, attractive, vibrant and progressive place to live, work and visit. As the main town, most additional housing development will have taken place here and a broader range of retailing, employment, services and facilities provided for a wide catchment area.

3.16 As part of a sub-regional [BULLSHIT] vision [BULLSHIT] with Great Yarmouth, the regeneration of the towns will have been addressed through a complementary and integrated approach to the shared issues of geographically remote and coastal locations, economic and social deprivation. The towns will retain their important District/Borough roles as the main towns but they will also complement each other through their differences. Their sub-regional [BULLSHIT] function will have been enhanced through improved transport linkages between them and beyond. The synergy [BULLSHIT] of the sub-region will have raised the status and profile of each town.

3.17 The Lake Lothing and outer harbour area of Lowestoft will be regenerated with a thriving mix of uses throughout the day and evening, integrated with the seafront and shopping streets to the north and south. There will be public access to the water frontage and public spaces for people to meet and play. Connection between the north and south of the town will have improved and measures to protect against the risk of flooding will be in place. The port will have top quality freight handling and distribution facilities, fabrication, services and facilities for the offshore industry. The port will also have a role as a gateway to Europe for trade and as a hub as part of an integrated transport network.

3.18 Ness Point, as the most easterly point in Britain, will have a nationally high profile. It will be an important tourism destination with high quality links to the historic High Street area. The area will provide a nationally important cluster for renewable energy activity and businesses in the form of a Power Park; building on the success of the Gulliver wind turbine and the OrbisEnergy accommodation for renewable energy related companies.

3.19 The attraction of the beaches, coast and the Broads will continue to provide an income for the tourism industry. The town will offer a range of indoor and outdoor facilities and high quality accommodation to meet the needs of local people and tourists all year.

3.20 Lowestoft will provide an important role in further education and the development of skills. Deprivation will have been reduced in those areas of the town suffering from the highest levels. People will be healthier, with improved access to health facilities and homelessness will have reduced.

3.21 Travel within the town will be easier, with a much higher percentage of the population walking and cycling for shorter trips.  Public transport will have improved as the status of Lowestoft as a Regional Transport Node is recognised. There will be improved rail and bus links with other urban centres in the region and with London and to national networks. The frequency and quality of bus services within and beyond the town will be good and integrated with rail services. In particular, linkages along the A12 with Great Yarmouth will be strengthened.

Beccles

Beccles town centre

3.22 Beccles (with Worlingham) market town will continue to fulfil its role as the largest market town in the District serving the local population and surrounding villages in Waveney and South Norfolk District. The attractive and historic town centre will be vibrant with a broader range of shops and services. Tourism, based on the historic character of the town and the Broads will be increasingly important to the local economy. The vibrancy of the town will be further enhanced by infrastructure improvements to provide an hourly rail service on the East Suffolk Line. Beccles Business Park at Ellough will offer additional opportunities for local employment and a southern relief road will have removed the related heavy goods traffic from the town centre and surrounding villages. Some additional housing development will have taken place within the existing built-up area and additional leisure and recreation facilities will have been provided.

Bungay

Bungay town centre

3.23 Bungay will perform a stronger role, as a historic market town that can increasingly meet its own needs and those of the surrounding villages in Waveney and South Norfolk. Improved traffic management and highway improvements will have enhanced the town centre, increasing its attractiveness as a centre for retail investment and Broads related tourism. New employment development will have reduced the need to travel to work and some housing development would have taken place without the need to breach the environmental limits of the town. A new community facility will provide a range of services and facilities in one location to serve local needs.

Halesworth

Halesworth town centre

3.24 Halesworth will prosper as a historic market town and become increasingly self-contained, meeting the needs of the local community and some of the surrounding villages in Waveney, Suffolk Coastal and Mid Suffolk Districts. Some residential and employment development will have taken place and the range of shops and services will have broadened. A new community building will provide a range of services and facilities and additional playing field and sports provision will have been met.  Access to health care will have improved.

Southwold

Southwold beach

3.25 Southwold will prosper as a unique and historic market town and resort town, not least because of the quality of its coastal location and built and natural environment. These qualities will continue to be protected and enhanced. More effective traffic management will assist in reducing the impact of visitor traffic on the environment. Situated in the Suffolk Coast and Heaths AONB and Heritage Coast only limited and small-scale housing development will have taken place within the built-up area. Development in the harbour area will have been managed so as to balance the needs of the fishing industry with the pressure for change, flood risk and the high quality of the environment. The adjacent village of Reydon will continue to function as part of a wider Southwold/Reydon area. Some employment development serving both communities will have taken place in Reydon. Likewise, some enhanced playing field provision will have been provided in Reydon to support local teams. The village will have experienced only small-scale housing development.

Kessingland

Local shops, Kessingland

3.26 Kessingland will continue to be the largest village in the District. Its services and facilities will have been broadened to reflect the size and needs of the community and to enhance [BULLSHIT] its ability to provide for the needs of the surrounding villages. Tourism will continue to provide local employment opportunities and to support the local economy. However, Kessingland will continue to be heavily reliant on nearby Lowestoft for employment and a greater range of shops, services and facilities. Drainage and flooding issues will have been addressed and there will be improved access to health care and education. Additional playing pitches and facilities for young people will have been provided. Only small-scale housing development will have taken place within the built-up area or to meet the need for affordable housing.

Villages

Village shop, Wrentham

3.27 The villages of Barnby and North Cove, Blundeston, Corton, Holton, Wangford and Wrentham will also have retained and broadened their services and facilities where opportunities had arisen, to meet the needs of their local populations and some surrounding villages. Only small-scale housing development will have taken place within the settlements. Some development will have taken place on the edge of the villages to meet the need for affordable housing, services and facilities and to support the rural economy.

Core Strategy Objectives to deliver the Vision [BULLSHIT]

3.28 Core Strategy objectives to deliver this vision [BULLSHIT] are:

1. Promoting the regeneration and renaissance of the Lowestoft sub-regional [BULLSHIT] area (with Great Yarmouth), in particular the central area of Lowestoft in and around Lake Lothing and the harbour, and the market towns of Beccles, Bungay, Halesworth and Southwold

2. Where appropriate, achieving social and economic regeneration of the most deprived wards in Waveney through a community based approach

3. Improving the health of the population and in particular reducing health inequalities [BULLSHIT] 

4. Addressing low educational achievement and aspiration

5. Reducing rates of crime and fear of crime

6. Promoting balanced and mixed communities through housing provision and in particular addressing the need for affordable housing

7. Achieving more sustainable communities [BULLSHIT] by ensuring facilities and services are commensurate with development

8. Improving access to services and facilities, especially for those people living in rural areas

9. Securing schemes of high quality design which enhance [BULLSHIT] the environment and reflect the character of the District

10. Meeting the jobs growth target for the District

11. Developing the renewable energy and educational sectors

12. Promoting sustainable [BULLSHIT] tourism and the cultural development of the District

13. Supporting our town centres as sustainable [BULLSHIT] locations for a mix of uses

14. Making the most efficient use of land and giving priority [BULLSHIT] to the redevelopment of previously used land

15. Minimising the impact of climate change

16. Achieving sustainable [BULLSHIT] transport, and in particular increasing cycling, walking and use of public transport and so reducing reliance on the car for travel

17. Conserving and enhancing [BULLSHIT] the natural, built and historic environment

4. Spatial [BULLSHIT] Strategy for Waveney - How we get there

4.1 The spatial [BULLSHIT] strategy (CS01) seeks to deliver the spatial [BULLSHIT] vision [BULLSHIT] and objectives for the District and has been shaped through consultation and the sustainability appraisal of options and policies. It provides a broad indication of the overall scale of development in the District and the infrastructure needed to support it. The strategy proposed for Waveney has an essential role in achieving the appropriate balance between protection and improving the quality of life [BULLSHIT] for all, including ensuring that necessary change and development is sustainable [BULLSHIT] in the interests of future generations [BULLSHIT]. Policies CS02 to CS17 seek to deliver the spatial [BULLSHIT] strategy and provide the context for the preparation of the other Development Plan Documents.

1st East Logo4.2 The spatial [BULLSHIT] strategy reflects the priority [BULLSHIT] regeneration status of the District as identified in the East of England Plan (May 2008), with a particular focus on delivering a sub-regional [BULLSHIT] approach to the regeneration of Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth. 1st East urban regeneration company will be key to the delivery of the sub-regional [BULLSHIT] elements of the spatial [BULLSHIT] strategy. Fundamental to the delivery of economic, social and environmental regeneration in Lowestoft will be the ability to provide flood protection and mitigation measures (Policies CS05 and CS03).

4.3 The spatial [BULLSHIT] strategy reflects the existing and future role and function of settlements in Waveney. The emphasis on regeneration, as opposed to growth, means it is not anticipated that the general size of settlements will change significantly. However, in some cases, in accordance with the spatial [BULLSHIT] vision [BULLSHIT], their functions need to be enhanced or strengthened.

4.4 Most new development in Waveney will take place in Lowestoft followed by the market towns. The towns are regarded as the most suitable locations for future development by virtue of their existing access to services and facilities, thereby providing the opportunity to reduce out-commuting and the need to travel. Development in the towns is seen as contributing not only to their regeneration, through provision of additional services and facilities, but also to the rural areas they serve. Directing development to the market towns, may help to claw back lost services and facilities and help to make them more self-contained and sustainable [BULLSHIT] in their own right.

4.5 Adapting to and mitigating the effects of climate change are an integral part of the spatial [BULLSHIT] strategy and cut across all policies. The strategy and policies will have an important role in assisting in the implementation of the Suffolk Climate Action Plan [BULLSHIT], which seeks a 60% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions by 2025 and a climate-resilient Suffolk.

4.6 A high quality environment has a key role in delivering the spatial [BULLSHIT] strategy. It is important for the quality of life of Waveney residents and improves the perception and attractiveness of the area for visitors and investment.  Green infrastructure, such as open space, biodiversity, geodiversity and other semi-natural features will be protected and enhanced across the District. In particular, a network of green wildlife corridors and spaces will be protected and enhanced in Lowestoft, the market towns and larger villages. (Policy CS16). Green infrastructure also has a role in our adaption to climate change and contributing to carbon neutral development.

4.7 Healthier communities is a key priority [BULLSHIT] in the Waveney Sustainable Communities [BULLSHIT] Strategy and the Great Yarmouth and Waveney Primary Care Trust (PCT) review of the provision and delivery of health care is integral to the spatial [BULLSHIT] strategy. Accessibility will be improved through provision closer to home, via new community resource centres/sites providing a comprehensive care approach for the individual, along with other services and facilities. Mobile services will provide outreach to the rural areas. This new approach will focus on Lowestoft and the market towns in accordance with the spatial [BULLSHIT] strategy (Policy CS01).

4.8 Suffolk County Council is currently undertaking [BULLSHIT] a review of how schools are organised in Suffolk, moving from a three-tier education system to a two-tier, of primary and secondary schools. As part of the strategy, the existing rural primary schools are to be retained. Although many of them are not in the most sustainable [BULLSHIT] settlements, their protection will assist in meeting the objective of improving access to services and facilities in rural areas. The review is being carried out in three phases with Lowestoft in Phase 1 and Beccles and Bungay in Phase 2. It will be important to guide any future education provision to the most sustainable [BULLSHIT] and accessible locations in accordance with the spatial [BULLSHIT] strategy. (Policy CS09).

Lowestoft
4.9 Lowestoft will accommodate approximately 70 to 80% of the housing growth for the District (Policy CS11). In accordance with the findings of the Strategic [BULLSHIT] Housing Land Availability Assessment (Nov 2007) it is expected that, over and above the implementation of existing planning permissions, this can almost exclusively be accommodated on previously developed land. The Housing Market Assessment (September 2007) advises that 30% of housing delivered across the District should be social housing, mainly for rent although up to 10% should be intermediate housing such as shared equity.

4.10 It is also expected that approximately 70 to 80% of the additional jobs to be provided in the District (5,000) will be accommodated in Lowestoft. This focus will seek to provide an alignment between the growth of employment and housing. The Lake Lothing and Outer Harbour area of Lowestoft will accommodate most employment growth (Policy CS07) and will have a key role in fulfilling Lowestoft’s role as a Strategic [BULLSHIT] Employment Location, as defined in the East of England Plan i.e. supporting port expansion, regeneration and economic diversification. An Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] is being prepared to assist in bringing about this change. Fundamental to the delivery of regeneration will be the need to address flood risk. The Council will continue to work with the Environment Agency and other partners to develop and implement a strategic [BULLSHIT] approach to reduce the level of risk. Lowestoft is well positioned to capitalise on the growth in offshore wind energy in the North Sea and to diversify the local economy into the renewable energy sector and research and development sectors. To this end the area around Ness Point will be identified in the Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] for the development of a renewable energy cluster of businesses (Policy CS08).

4.11 As a ‘major town centre’ in the Region, Lowestoft will be the focus for most retail and leisure growth in the District (Policy CS10). Retail development as part of mixed-use schemes will be important to the regeneration, including cultural and tourism, prospects for the town. The primary focus for delivery will be the town centre and to the south and east towards the water frontage of Lake Lothing and the outer harbour.

4.12 Integral to the regeneration of Lowestoft and the wider sub-region with Great Yarmouth are a range of transport measures (Policy CS15). These would include measures to reduce congestion, improve safety and enhance [BULLSHIT] connectivity between north and south Lowestoft and with Great Yarmouth. In developing the Core Strategy, the sustainability appraisal highlighted the importance of bringing about behavioural change to increase the use of sustainable [BULLSHIT] modes of transport. Bringing about this change will be integral to the future growth and transport strategy for Lowestoft.

Market Towns
4.13 The market towns in Waveney have a key role to play in acting as service centres for the surrounding rural populations and villages. They provide a focal point for employment, shopping and community facilities, serving as a hub for rural public transport. Response to the consultation highlighted that the market towns were struggling to fulfil this function and that their role could be further undermined if development was dispersed across lower order settlements in the rural areas. Feedback suggested a two-fold strategy of supporting the market towns and some flexibility in the rural areas by allowing only small-scale development where appropriate. Improving transport accessibility to the market towns from the surrounding rural areas will be important in achieving their regeneration. The Council also tested whether there was a role for identifying Beccles as the largest of the market towns that should therefore take a larger proportional share of future development. Feedback suggested that the amount of development in the market towns should reflect the opportunities for development on previously developed land.

4.14 The results of the Strategic [BULLSHIT] Land Availability Assessment (Nov 2007) indicate the potential for 15% to 25% of housing to take place in the market towns with most growth in Beccles and Halesworth. Less development would be expected in Bungay and Southwold/Reydon. There was also considerable support for affordable housing being focused on the market towns, rather than dispersal into the rural areas.

4.15 The market towns will also have the role in meeting the job growth target for the District, providing approximately 20% of the target. To this end existing employment areas will continue to be protected. In addition, further employment land will be identified, to meet local needs and attract inward investment.

4.16 The vitality and viability of the market towns will be strengthened through a focus on development within their town centres (Policy CS10). The Retail and Leisure Study (Aug 2006) defined Beccles as second in the District retail hierarchy. As such, outside Lowestoft, most retail development will be directed to Beccles town centre.

4.17 Integral to the self-containment of communities is community empowerment [BULLSHIT] and the provision of supporting facilities such as community halls, playing fields and leisure facilities. Meeting existing deficiencies and making additional provision is a key part of this strategy towards which developers will be expected to contribute (Policies CS04 and CS14).

Larger villages
4.18 The East of England Plan (May 2008) identifies villages, smaller than market towns, as being able to play the role of Key Service Centres. Key Service Centres are defined as larger villages with a good level of services. These could include a primary or indeed secondary school, a doctors surgery, shops to meet everyday needs, local employment opportunities and frequent public transport to larger centres.

4.19 'Other rural settlements', defined by the East of England Plan (May 2008), are villages that have very few, if any services, and are dependent on larger centres for their everyday needs. The vast majority of the villages within rural Waveney would therefore be defined as 'other rural settlements'. This settlement pattern emphasises the reliance of rural Waveney on its market towns.

4.20 The Council's analysis of services in villages of more than 300 people reveals that only one village, Kessingland, meets all the criteria for a key service centre. Kessingland's population is equivalent in size to that of the market towns of Halesworth or Bungay, but it lacks the same level of services. Services and facilities are perhaps not as great as the analysis implies because of the village's dependence and proximity to Lowestoft. In addition, there are limited opportunities for development and drainage and flooding issues need to be resolved. The Council does not consider that Kessingland could perform the role of a Key Service Centre.

4.21 Therefore, in order that the vast majority of rural Waveney is not deprived of at least the potential for some additional housing, services and facilities, and to assist in diversifying the rural economy, 'Larger Villages' have been defined, as a sub-division of the catch-all 'other rural settlements' category contained in the East of England Plan (May 2008). The aim of 'Larger Villages' is that they can provide a focus to assist in both maintaining and enhancing [BULLSHIT] the provision of services in rural areas. This will require a partnership approach with service providers supporting the hierarchy of settlement approach. Small-scale development will also be supported in the larger villages to assist the local economy and provide for affordable housing.  It is expected that only up to 5% of future housing in the District will be in the 'Larger Villages'.

Outside the Larger Villages
4.22 Outside the larger villages the objective is to safeguard the countryside for its own sake and to protect the existing service provision. Development in these locations is likely to be unsustainable, because of poor levels of public transport and few services and facilities. Exceptions to this approach will be development of an appropriate scale that assists the agricultural industry or diversifies the local economy. The reuse of existing buildings will be encouraged in preference to new buildings (Policy CS07). Conversion of existing buildings should be in conformity with policies CS17 (Built and Historic Environment) and CS16 (Natural Environment); for example bat surveys will be required where appropriate. Infill housing development of 1 or two dwellings may be acceptable as a means of allowing some, albeit limited, opportunities for housing in the rural areas, subject to the character and form of the settlement and access to services and facilities.  Affordable housing may also be acceptable, subject to an identified housing need, minimising impact on the environment and consideration of access to services and facilities.

4.23 Appropriate sites to deliver the spatial [BULLSHIT] strategy will be identified in the Site Specific Allocations document and the Lake Lothing and Outer Harbour Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]. Detailed policies, including physical limits to settlements, will be included in the Development Management Policies document.

Policy CS01 - Spatial [BULLSHIT] Strategy 

Most new development such as housing, employment, retail, services and facilities will take place in the main town of Lowestoft, followed by the Market Towns. The focus for development will be on previously developed land within the built-up areas, with more than 50% of housing and 60% of employment expected to be delivered on brownfield sites. An integral part of the strategy will be to protect and enhance [BULLSHIT] local distinctiveness and the green infrastructure of the District, such as open space and biodiversity.

Lowestoft (including Carlton Colville and Oulton):
Lowestoft will be a focus for regeneration, particularly around Lake Lothing and the Outer Harbour area. The town will accommodate approximately 70 to 80% of the housing growth for the District and 70 to 80% of the additional 5,000 jobs. Of particular importance will be the development of a renewable energy cluster of businesses and growth of the knowledge economy. Most retail growth will take place in Lowestoft through the expansion of the town centre towards the Lake Lothing and Outer Harbour water frontage. Priority [BULLSHIT] will be given to the delivery of infrastructure, such as flood protection measures and transport improvements, as essential to facilitating [BULLSHIT] economic and social regeneration.

Market towns:
The market towns of Beccles with Worlingham, Halesworth, Bungay and Southwold with Reydon will accommodate approximately 15-25% of the District housing growth and 20% of the additional jobs. Most housing development will be accommodated on previously developed sites in Beccles and Halesworth. All the market towns will experience further employment development on previously developed and greenfield sites. As the largest market town, Beccles will provide the focus for most retail development after Lowestoft. An increase in public transport and demand responsive transport, particularly between the market towns, larger villages and more remote rural areas will continue to be promoted to improve rural accessibility to services and facilities.

Larger Villages:
A small amount of new housing, employment and services and facilities development will be focused on a number of designated larger villages. Up to 5% of the housing growth will be focused in these villages. Where a local housing need is demonstrated, the priority [BULLSHIT] will be for affordable housing. Most development will take place on brownfield sites within the villages but some development may be needed on greenfield sites on the edge. The larger villages are Barnby/North Cove, Kessingland, Blundeston, Wangford, Corton, Wrentham and Holton.

Outside these locations, development will be regarded as being in the open countryside where the objective is to preserve the countryside for its own sake. Exceptions to this overall approach will be infill housing development and affordable housing that meets a local need, both subject to the character and form of the settlement and access to services and facilities. Other exceptions will be developments of an appropriate scale that contribute to the continued viability of the agricultural industry and/or diversify the local rural economy.

5. Core Policies

Achieving Good Quality Development and Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Design

Construction, Beccles

5.1 One of the key aims of the Waveney Sustainable Communities [BULLSHIT] Strategy is to create safer, stronger and sustainable communities [BULLSHIT], and achieving good quality, sustainable [BULLSHIT] design will contribute to a number of priority [BULLSHIT] actions in this area.

5.2 Good design needs to provide attractive buildings and spaces. But if it is going to last, then it also needs to reflect local character and distinctiveness and create places for people. Ways of integrating a mix of uses need to be explored, particularly in central locations. This not only makes the most efficient use of land but also potentially enables opportunities for increasing services and facilities. Any proposals, however, should also minimise their use of resources and their overall impact on the environment.

5.3 Good design is an integral part of sustainable [BULLSHIT] development, especially in terms of choices of location for particular land uses, access and use of resources. Developing an understanding of the characteristics of the area and its context is an important aspect of achieving good quality, attractive and well-used buildings and spaces. Most outline and detailed developments (with the exception of those exempted in DCLG Circular 01/2006), must be accompanied by a Design and Access Statement which sets out how the proposals has addressed the design considerations mentioned in the policy. Developments should incorporate 'Secured by Design' principles to reduce opportunities for crime and reduce the fear of crime.

5.4 Building regulations set minimum national standards for energy efficiency in new buildings. The Government proposes to incrementally improve the energy performance of building regulations in the future, with all new homes required to meet a 'zero carbon' standard by 2016, as set out in Building a Greener Future (2007). The Government has also suggested introducing performance standards for water efficiency through building regulations in the future. Building regulations are outside the scope of the Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT] and as such will not be used to determine planning applications. Planning policies aim to complement advances in building regulations by encouraging other aspects of sustainable [BULLSHIT] design for example providing green spaces for the benefit of people and wildlife, facilitating [BULLSHIT] walking and cycling in a safe, accessible environment, and incorporating features to help developments adapt to future climate change. Policies may promote higher performance standards where appropriate.

5.5 The Code for Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Homes is a national standard for assessing the sustainability performance of new homes. It sets higher standards than those required by building regulations and addresses a wider range of sustainability criteria, covering energy and water efficiency, building materials, surface water run-off, waste, pollution, health and well-being [BULLSHIT], site management and ecology. Assessment against the Code is currently voluntary, but the Government is likely to introduce mandatory assessment for all new homes in 2008. Achievement of the higher levels of the Code will be encouraged.

5.6 To assist in implementing this Core Strategy policy, more detailed design policies will be included in the Development Management Policy document. This will include the setting of a target percentage of the energy to be used in new development to come from decentralised and renewable or low carbon energy sources. Regard should also be had to policies in the East of England Plan and the supplement to Planning Policy Statement 1 - Planning and Climate Change. The Council may also wish to promote design principles further in a Supplementary Planning Document.

 

Policy CS02 - High Quality and Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Design

All development proposals must demonstrate a high quality and sustainable [BULLSHIT] design that positively improves the character, appearance and environmental quality of an area and the way it functions. In particular, proposals should:-

  • create places and spaces for people
  • reflect local character and distinctiveness
  • protect local amenity
  • consider opportunities for a mix of uses
  • consider opportunities for public art
  • create safe, healthy and accessible environments
  • make good provision for access by all transport modes
  • ensure accessible environments that give priority [BULLSHIT] to pedestrian and cycle access and provide linkages and integration with surrounding housing, employment, services, facilities and spaces
  • deliver higher densities in places with good public transport accessibility
  • protect historic character and integrate historic buildings and features where these occur
  • provide, conserve and enhance [BULLSHIT] biodiversity and create linkages between green spaces and wildlife corridors

All development proposals will be expected to seek to minimise carbon dioxide emissions through sustainable [BULLSHIT] design and construction, energy efficiency and the incorporation of renewable energy technology as appropriate. Proposals should also seek to minimise the use of water resources and the production of waste. Most proposals, including all proposals dealing with historic sites, should be accompanied by a Design and Access Statement.

Flooding and Coastal Erosion

Coastal Erosion
5.7 Many of the nationally and internationally designated sites of landscape, ecological and geodiversity importance lie within the coastal strip. The undefended stretch of coast is one of the fastest eroding coastlines in the country, and this will be compounded by climate change and sea level rise. Coastal retreat can create new opportunities for wildlife. The Council regard these assets as an important resource for current and future generations [BULLSHIT]. Therefore, taking into account the Shoreline Management Plans for the District, the Council will work to preserve and enhance [BULLSHIT] these sites through positive action [BULLSHIT] and through the operation of development management policies.

Coastal Defences, Corton

5.8 Coastal erosion also affects the built environment and local communities. A review of the Shoreline Management Plan covering the stretch of coastline from the northern boundary of the District to Lowestoft Ness was published in 2006. One of the main implications of the review is that a policy of managed retreat is proposed for Corton in the medium to long term. This means that the existing coastal defences at Corton will not be replaced when they fail, although they are currently predicted to last for the next 20-30 years. Either side of Corton, towards Hopton and Lowestoft, are areas of "no active intervention", where the shoreline will be allowed to retreat. The Shoreline Management Plan for Lowestoft Ness to Harwich was published in 1998, and a review is currently in progress. A policy of "hold the line" was recommended for the main settlements along this section of the coast (Lowestoft, Kessingland and Southwold) in the 1998 Plan. For other, more sparsely populated, areas of the coast the recommendation was to allow retreat of the existing shoreline over the next 75 years. A small number of residential properties in Waveney could be lost to coastal erosion before 2021. Any new dwellings intended to replace those threatened by coastal erosion should be located in accordance with the settlement strategy (policy CS01). Alternative sites may also need to be identified for commercial uses, such as tourism. This will be kept under review, and given further consideration in the Development Management Policies DPD. The Council will work with partners [BULLSHIT] and the communities likely to be most affected, to consider the land use options for the way forward [BULLSHIT].

Flood Risk
5.9 Flood risk, whether coastal or fluvial is an issue of particular concern, especially where it affects the built-up areas of the District. Climate change will compound this issue. It is essential that development adapts to and reduces the impact of climate change.

5.10 During the preparation of this Strategy views were sought on the approach the Council should take to flood risk and the identification of land for development. To meet the wider sustainability objectives through the identified need to regenerate existing areas, the preferred option was to continue to focus development on brownfield sites, rather than greenfield, and to reduce the impact of flooding through design where needed. A combined approach is proposed that seeks to locate development so as to minimise the risk of flooding and requiring full mitigation where necessary. The Council, together with Suffolk Coastal District Council, commissioned a Strategic [BULLSHIT] Flood Risk Assessment (February 2008) that will assist in identifying appropriate sites for development.

5.11 PPS25, published in December 2006, sets out the national policy on Development & Flood Risk. It includes a Sequential Test to ensure that development should not take place in areas at high risk of flooding when appropriate areas of lower risk are reasonably available. Alternative lower risk sites need to be appropriate for the type of development proposed and consistent with wider sustainability objectives. The Lake Lothing and harbour areas of Lowestoft, covered by 1st East Urban Regeneration Company, generally fall within Flood Zones 2 and 3, with a high risk of flooding from the sea. The Strategic [BULLSHIT] Flood Risk Assessment (February 2008) shows that this risk will increase over the next century due to climate change and predicted sea level rise. There is, however, an overriding need for regeneration in this area, as identified in the East of England Plan (May 2008) Policy GYL1. Development in this location would benefit the wider population through helping to address many of the sustainability issues that have been identified for Waveney and providing the opportunity to deliver improved flood defences for Lowestoft. As part of the preparation of this strategy, the PPS25 sequential and exceptions tests have been applied to development options across the District, informed by the Strategic [BULLSHIT] Flood Risk Assessment. Consequently, some development in Flood Zones 2 and 3a is proposed within the Urban Regeneration Company boundary, provided that the risk can be fully mitigated by engineering and design measures. Outside of the Urban Regeneration Company boundary, the Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT] will not allocate land, or grant planning permission, for highly or more vulnerable uses (including housing, as defined in PPS25) in Flood Zones 2 and 3.

5.12 The emerging Blyth Estuary Flood Risk Management Strategy could have an impact on flood risk in the south of the District. The projected short to medium term impacts of the draft Strategy (Sept 2007) include more frequent flooding of some properties near Southwold Harbour, the A12 and the A1095, increased flows through the harbour and habitat loss.

Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Drainage Systems
5.13 The use of Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Drainage Systems for dealing with surface water run-off from new developments will be required, unless, following an adequate assessment, soil conditions and/or engineering feasibility dictates otherwise.

Policy CS03 - Flooding and Coastal Erosion

Proposals for development in Waveney will need to respect the environment of the District and in particular be aware of the potential impact of climate change. Sustainable [BULLSHIT] design and in particular the provision of sustainable [BULLSHIT] drainage systems will therefore be an important consideration in the determination of all appropriate development. Development that would increase the risk of flooding or coastal erosion will not be permitted.

Proposals should avoid high flood risk areas (as defined by PPS25 Flood Zones 2 and 3a) unless it can be demonstrated that:

  • appropriate land at a lower risk is not available;
  • there are exceptional reasons for locating the development within such areas; and
  • the risk can be fully mitigated by engineering and design measures. 

Appropriate developments will require a flood risk assessment.

Land will not be allocated for highly or more vulnerable uses (including housing) in Flood Zones 2 and 3a. The only exception will be within the boundary of the 1st East Urban Regeneration Company area of Lowestoft when the development contributes to the delivery of regeneration objectives set out in Policy CS05 and the Lake Lothing and Outer Harbour Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT], and the above criteria can be met.

Proposals should similarly avoid areas at risk from coastal erosion and ensure they are compatible with the appropriate Shoreline Management Plan. Proposals close to cliff edges or existing coastal defences will be required to undertake [BULLSHIT] a risk assessment.

Infrastructure

Cycle Path, Lowestoft

5.14 As people tend to spend a large proportion of their time in and around their homes, a good living environment [BULLSHIT] makes an important contribution to the quality of life. Jobs, health, education, shops, leisure and community facilities, open space, sport and recreation need to be provided where they can be easily accessed by everyone on foot, cycle or those using public transport. In particular, the Council needs to promote communities that are inclusive, healthy, safe and crime free, whilst respecting the diverse needs of residents.

A partnership approach
5.15 The Council will work with partners [BULLSHIT] and infrastructure providers to address the infrastructure needs in Waveney, ranging from the provision of health and education facilities across the District, to addressing sewage and drainage issues in Kessingland and the provision of playing fields in Halesworth, Kessingland and Southwold/Reydon.

5.16 The Waveney Prospectus (Aug 2007) highlights the community needs of the market towns, including the widespread need for community buildings that provide community space and accommodate a range of service providers, such as Jobcentre Plus, the police, the Primary Care Trust and local authority services. Halesworth, for example, has had a long term need for such a centre and Bungay is currently making progress towards a multi-agency [BULLSHIT] community building. The PCT have identified the need for health centres in north and south Lowestoft. Following their recent review it is expected that further needs will be identified. Developer contributions will be sought to assist in the provision of community infrastructure.

Developer Contributions
5.17 There is increasing recognition that the community can benefit through the granting of planning permission. The Government is planning to introduce a Community Infrastructure Levy on development by 2009, to address local infrastructure deficits. It is envisaged that this would supplement planning obligations, which are already negotiated with developers (e.g. Section 106 Agreements) and could be used to fund wider infrastructure requirements to help make growing communities more sustainable [BULLSHIT]. In addition to contributions sought from developers, infrastructure requirements will  also be funded by regional, national and European funding sources.

5.18 All forms of development, whether large or small, residential or non-residential, can place an additional demand on the existing infrastructure, services and facilities in the District. The Policy therefore identifies the range of services and facilities towards which developers might contribute depending on the nature, scale and location of the development. Some of these key infrastructure needs to be addressed in Waveney are identified in Policies CS14 and CS15 relating to cultural facilities and transport measures. The Delivery Framework [BULLSHIT] provides some additional information. Further detail on the implementation of this policy will be included in association with sites allocated in the Site Specific Allocations Document, the Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] for Lake Lothing and the Outer Harbour, the Development Management Policies document and a Planning Obligations Supplementary Planning Document.

Policy CS04 - Infrastructure

The District Council will work with the Local Strategic [BULLSHIT] Partnership, Suffolk County Council and other partners to address the infrastructure needs in Waveney in accordance with the settlement strategy.

Developers must consider the infrastructure requirements needed to support and service the proposed development. They will need to demonstrate, to the satisfaction of the Local Planning Authority or infrastructure provider, that adequate capacity [BULLSHIT] either exists or that provision will be made to meet the necessary infrastructure requirements within an appropriate time scale. Provision may also include some or all of the following:

Affordable housing (including supported housing)
Open Space (including play areas, sport and recreation)
Community facilities (including youth activities and meeting venues)
Cultural facilities (including libraries, public art and archaeology)
Health and social care facilities
Education (including early years provision and community education)
P
olice/crime reduction measures
Transport infrastructure (including footpaths, bridleways, cycleways, cycle parking facilities and roads)
Public transport (including services and facilities)
Surface water management and flood risk management
Environmental improvements
Waste recycling facilities
Fire services
Shopping facilities

Particular infrastructure projects for which contributions will be sought include provision of:
Infrastructure detailed in policies CS14 Culture and CS15 Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Transport
Infrastructure needed to support regeneration in the Lake Lothing and Outer Harbour Area (Policy CS05)
Community centres or multi-agency [BULLSHIT] one-stop shops in the market towns and Kessingland
Drainage and flood alleviation in Kessingland
Health centres in south and north Lowestoft

Contributions through full provision, land or commuted payments will be secured through planning obligations or conditions. The specific requirements, type of contribution and how it will be secured will be determined through negotiation with the Local Planning Authority working in partnership with [BULLSHIT] the appropriate public, private and voluntary agencies [BULLSHIT].

Regneration and Renaissance

5.19 The East of England Plan (May 2008) identifies the Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth areas as priority [BULLSHIT] areas for regeneration that are characterised by weak economic performance and high deprivation. Waveney has relatively high levels of unemployment, below national average wage levels, poor education attainment and aspiration, and this combined with other indices of social deprivation such as poor health means that these issues can only be tackled by a broad partnership.

5.20 The main built-up areas of Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft are identified in the East of England Plan (May 2008) as Key Centres of Development and Change. Whilst the area suffers from relatively high levels of unemployment and has severe pockets of deprivation, it also has many attributes. Both towns have access to a high quality coast and countryside, which adjoins the Broads.

5.21 The Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft Sub Regional Framework [BULLSHIT] Study (Apr 2003) indicated that the area could continue to rely on its existing industrial base, but if it did then the growth in employment would be more modest than other parts of the region. As a result, the study recommended that the sub-region promote and develop other sectors, especially sustainable [BULLSHIT] tourism, the renewable energy and the knowledge economy based on new educational facilities. The recommendations of this study were incorporated into the East of England Plan (May 2008) Policy GYL1 for Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth.

5.22 Policy GYL1 also spells out the approach of encouraging urban renaissance by identifying priority [BULLSHIT] areas and projects for brownfield redevelopment in order to achieve economic, physical and social regeneration. It particularly highlighted key waterfront sites in both towns. The Lake Lothing area of Lowestoft is specifically mentioned as important for its concentration of maritime and leisure, offshore wind energy and electronics industries. A sub-regional [BULLSHIT] grouping of the Councils of Suffolk, Norfolk, Great Yarmouth, Waveney and the Broads Authority has been established to implement the sub-regional [BULLSHIT] strategy.

5.23 The earlier draft East of England Plan (Dec 2004) set out the need to establish an appropriate form of local delivery vehicle to implement the sub-regional [BULLSHIT] strategy based on a partnership with the local authorities, regional agencies [BULLSHIT] and local bodies. This resulted in a successful bid for the creation of 1st East, Urban Regeneration Company for the Lake Lothing and harbour areas of central Lowestoft and parts of Great Yarmouth. One of the conditions of its establishment was the requirement for a masterplan [BULLSHIT] for its area of operation.

Lake Lothing and Outer Harbour Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT], Lowestoft
5.24 The masterplan [BULLSHIT] is being prepared as an Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] for the respective geographical areas of each town. The emphasis of the Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] should be to address economic difficulties and in particular to tackle the need for growth in the number and quality of jobs. As a strategic [BULLSHIT] employment site this area is expected to provide at least 1000 additional jobs.  However, financial viability of development in this location is problematic and housing and other higher value uses have an important role to play in enabling employment development and regenerating the heart of Lowestoft. A well-integrated mix of different types and tenures of housing, to support a range of household sizes, ages and incomes, will be necessary. Approximately 1500 homes will be provided in the area. As identified in the Sub-Regional [BULLSHIT] Housing Market Assessment (September 2007), this should include family housing, specialised housing, housing for smaller households and accommodation to meet the needs of an aging population. The port is an important local and regional economic driver which will have a significant role in the future regeneration of Lowestoft, particularly through the Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]. Innovative ways of funding and delivering the Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] will be sought, in particular to achieve long held ambitions for a third crossing of Lake Lothing, as a means of improving connections between communities. One of the challenges [BULLSHIT] in securing regeneration of the area will be to achieve an acceptable level of flood risk. Proposals for development should have regard to the findings of the Strategic [BULLSHIT] Flood Risk Assessment (Feb 2008), as amended by the Cumulative Land Raising Study (June 2008), in identifying appropriate solutions. These could include land-raising on certain sites and/or improved flood defences. Addressing the flood risk issues in this locality will also have benefits for a wider area of Lowestoft. A further challenge [BULLSHIT] will be to reconcile the potentially conflicting nature of a mix of existing and future uses.

Lake Lothing and Outer Harbour Area Action Plan Boundary, Lowestoft 

Policy CS05 - Lake Lothing and Outer Harbour Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

An Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] for the Lake Lothing and Outer Harbour area of Lowestoft will be prepared focusing on employment-led regeneration. The objectives of this Plan will be to create:

  • a flourishing local economy to provide wealth and at least 1000 jobs;
  • employment and transport opportunities in the port, including greater use of the water;
  • a high quality, well-designed, mixed use and sustainable [BULLSHIT] built environment, that respects the existing qualities and character of the area, includes the integration of existing businesses wherever possible and makes maximum use of renewable energy technologies;
  • a safe and healthy local environment with well designed public and green space;
  • improved public access to the waterfront;
  • sufficient size, scale and density and the right layout to support basic amenities in the neighbourhood and to minimise use of resources;
  • good public transport and other transport infrastructure to reduce the need to travel, with a consequent reduction in congestion;
  • buildings, both individually and collectively, that achieve a high standard of design and which can meet different needs over time and minimise the use of resources;
  • a well integrated mix of in the region of 1500 decent homes of different types and tenures to support a range of household sizes, ages and incomes;
  • good quality local public services including education, health, leisure and community facilities;
  • an enhanced role for Lowestoft as a retail centre, including provision of around 21,000sqm of new (comparison) retail floorspace and associated leisure uses in an extension to the town centre in the Lake Lothing area;
  • a diverse, vibrant and creative local culture that builds on the strong maritime heritage traditions;
  • a better connection between the waterfront and the old industrial areas, the town centre and local communities;
  • better connections between the communities north and south of Lake Lothing;
  • a vibrant heart to the town for local people and visitors;
  • development which is safe in terms of flood risk for its lifetime, and does not increase the risk of flooding elsewhere
  • improved flood protection for the heart of Lowestoft;
  • support for the tourism economy through the promotion of uses such as hotels, leisure and marina facilities; and
  • links between the Broads and the seaside tourism areas.

Community Based Regeneration

Harbour, Normanston, St Margarets, Kirkley and Whitton Wards, Lowestoft
5.25 These urban wards in Lowestoft, in and adjacent to the Lake Lothing area, experience some of the worst examples of deprivation within the District. They are characterised by high levels of unemployment, single parent families, low car ownership and limited household facilities. There is also a low level of educational achievement and a high proportion of people with health problems. A comprehensive approach is needed to tackle these issues that cross the social and economic divide. The Sure Start programme, aimed at providing facilities for pre-school age children, has begun to address some of these issues. Another initiative [BULLSHIT] called Homezones within the Cambridge and Oxford Roads has focused on environmental improvements. A neighbourhood initiative [BULLSHIT] approach in south Lowestoft has helped to resolve some local problems within the Whitton area. The Lowestoft Together Neighbourhood Management Project aims to improve quality of life in the most deprived wards, with funding from the Government's Safer and Stronger Communities Fund. Opportunities also exist through the Local Transport Action Plan [BULLSHIT] to bring forward environmental and traffic management schemes in these areas. These community based approaches to the issues will be implemented alongside the measures in the Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] (Policy CS05).

Beccles, Bungay, Halesworth and Southwold
5.26 Beccles, Bungay and Halesworth have benefited in the last few years from a community based approach to regeneration, for example through Market Town Initiatives [BULLSHIT]. Good progress is currently being made towards establishing a Market Town Partnership for Bungay. Southwold may not be perceived as an area in need of regeneration but it has is own issues of an elderly population with limited access to services and facilities, extremely high house prices in the District, a high proportion of second homes, significant visitor pressure and a harbour area under pressure for change.

Harbour, Southwold

5.27 It is likely that there will be a need to focus attention on the role of market towns for regeneration activity for some time to come. This is particularly important to Waveney where the geographical distribution of population is based on the market towns with limited population in the surrounding settlements and hamlets. This means that the main thrust of both land use and regeneration strategy is on retaining services in the towns and developing good links between the towns and the surrounding rural areas. 

Kessingland
5.28 Kessingland lies immediately to the south of Lowestoft. It has a population size similar to that of Bungay or Halesworth, but it is not recognised as a market town. It has lost services, facilities and employment opportunities. It remains an important area for tourism, because of its access to the beach, tourist accommodation sites and the Africa Alive Wildlife Park. In 2004, Kessingland residents published a Parish Plan, and the Council will continue to support and assist the community of Kessingland in implementing and refreshing the Plan. 

Rural Areas
5.29 The deprivation in the rural areas is less readily apparent. There has been a gradual erosion of services especially with the closure of village shops since the 1970s. The rural area of the District is characterised by a large number of relatively small-populated settlements. Ways need to be found to compensate for the loss of services and facilities in these communities.

Town and Parish Plans
5.30 In the market towns and rural parishes, Town and Parish Plans provide an opportunity for local communities to identify local priorities [BULLSHIT] and develop plans to address the environmental, social and economic issues faced in the area. The number of completed Parish Plans is relatively low in Waveney so far; Kessingland published a Parish Plan in 2004 and the Blundeston and Flixton Parish Plan followed in 2005. However, a number of communities in the market towns and rural areas of Waveney have produced documents similar to Parish Plans or are currently working to produce Plans for their local areas, either alone or in partnership with [BULLSHIT] surrounding parishes.

The Waveney Prospectus
5.31 The Waveney Prospectus (Aug 2007) is a framework [BULLSHIT] and action plan [BULLSHIT] that provides a strategic [BULLSHIT] approach to achieving economic investment and community regeneration in the District over the next 10 years. It is particularly focused on Lowestoft (outside the URC area), the four market towns of Beccles, Bungay, Halesworth and Southwold and Kessingland. The Prospectus aims to support the preparation and delivery of key strategies [BULLSHIT] including the Economic Regeneration Strategy, Sustainable Communities [BULLSHIT] Strategy and the Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT]. It has been prepared with stakeholders and the local community, and addresses the aspirations of a wide range of [BULLSHIT] stakeholders.

Policy CS06 - Community Based Regeneration

All development will be expected to contribute towards the regeneration of Waveney. Where appropriate, the Council will promote a community based approach to regeneration in Lowestoft, the market towns and Kessingland, with a focus on the most deprived wards. The Council will also work with local communities, Suffolk ACRE and Suffolk Association of Local Councils to encourage the preparation of Town and Parish Plans and assist in their implementation. The settlement strategy will provide a framework [BULLSHIT] to help develop and promote services to meet the needs of market towns and rural areas in Waveney.

Employment

5.32 Economic development and enterprise are key objectives of the Waveney Sustainable Communities [BULLSHIT] Strategy. The Waveney Economic Partnership, the sub-regional [BULLSHIT] partnership with Great Yarmouth and the 1st East Urban Regeneration Company all have a key role to play in achieving outcomes [BULLSHIT] such as an increase in jobs, particularly of a higher quality and better paid.

Jobs Growth Target
5.33 The East of England Plan (May 2008) sets an indicative target of 5000 additional jobs in Waveney, for the period 2001 to 2021. Great Yarmouth has a similar figure. The Council regard this job target at the upper end of projections, but nevertheless consider it is an aspiration that, if achieved, will bring the sub-region and the two districts more into line with regional averages. Job growth will be achieved via the provision of employment land (B1, B2, B8) as well as other policies relating to uses such as retail, renewable energy, the knowledge economy and tourism.

Providing a balance between housing and jobs
5.34 The Regional Economic Strategy and the East of England Plan seek an improved balance between the provision of housing and jobs.  It is therefore proposed that 70-80% of the additional jobs in the District should be provided in Lowestoft, to match the provision of housing and address current shortages. The remaining jobs should be focused on the market towns and larger villages, with limited growth in the remoter rural areas. 

Strategic [BULLSHIT] Employment Locations
5.35 The East of England Plan (May 2008) notes that it is important to promote a range of sites to meet employment and investment opportunities to improve the offer of the sub-region. In particular, the sub-regional [BULLSHIT] strategy points to not just expanding the existing industries and exploiting the proximity of the District to Europe, but also taking advantage of the opportunities in the renewable energy, environmental and knowledge economy sectors. To this end, Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth are identified as Regionally Strategic [BULLSHIT] Employment Locations, where strategic [BULLSHIT] employment sites should be identified to support development associated with port expansion, regeneration and economic diversification.

Employment Sector Changes and Land Requirements
5.36 The Council also needs to consider employment locations in a wider context. The joint Employment Land Study for Waveney and Great Yarmouth (Jan 2006) supports the jobs growth target of 5000 jobs. The study includes forecast changes in employment by economic sector to 2021, as a basis for projecting employment land requirements. The main areas of decline are the agricultural and manufacturing sectors. This will be compensated for by growth in the service sectors such as financial and business services, retail, transport, education and health.

Table 4 Sectoral changes of employment types in Waveney 2001 to 2021
 

Sector

Change in number of jobs by 2021

2021 sectoral share of employment

Mining & quarrying

-370

0.3%

Construction

+1610

8.8%

Manufacturing

-3820

11.5%

Electricity, gas and water supply

-190

0.5%

Wholesale distribution

-190

4.9%

Retail

+1320

14.5%

Hotels & catering

-660

7.0%

Transport, storage & communication

+610

4.7%

Financial & business services

+2670

16.0%

Public admin

+1080

6.1%

Education & health

+1640

17.4%

Other community, social & personal service activities

+1500

7.5%

Total Jobs

+4880

100.0%


Source: Employment Land Study 2006

5.37 When translated into employment land type requirements (B1, B2, B8) the study concluded that Waveney should lose approximately 16 hectares of manufacturing and storage employment land (B2/B8) over the plan period. This would be compensated for by approximately 19 hectares of land for service employment (B1). It is anticipated that there would be a net gain in 1863 jobs on employment land over the plan period. Other land use types such as retail, education and health would assist in reaching the overall target of 5000 jobs. 

Table 5 Summary of Waveney employment land requirements 2001-2021

Year

B1 Business / Light Industrial

B2 General Industry

B8 Storage and Distribution

 

Jobs

Gross land required (ha)

Jobs

Gross land required (ha)

Jobs

Gross land required (ha)

2001-2006

900

6

-69

-1

-91

-2

2007-2011

912

6

-204

-2

-82

-1

2012-2016

711

4

-200

-2

-78

-1

2017-2021

526

3

-289

-3

-172

-3

Total 2001-2021

3049

19

-762

-9

-424

-7

Source: Employment Land Study 2006. Some totals do not sum due to rounding.

5.38 To some extent the general industrial land could be reused for light industrial use, although changes of use and redevelopment would be required which could be slow. Extra land is therefore needed to enable this shift and to provide variety and quality in particular localities [BULLSHIT], including the need to support business clusters. The Study also highlighted the demand for modern units and serviced sites. The lack of activity in the private sector to service sites or build accommodation on a speculative basis, points strongly to a need for public sector intervention. There is therefore a need for a longer-term strategy approach, focusing on a shift towards making land provision for quality light industrial/business use (B1), at the same time as addressing the short term needs in the towns. The Business Employment Survey undertaken [BULLSHIT] as part of the Study also highlighted skills shortages, particularly in the manufacturing and business sectors.

Employment Land Provision
5.39 The study concludes that with the exception of parts of the Lake Lothing area, existing employment areas and allocations should continue to be protected in Lowestoft, Beccles, Bungay, Halesworth and Southwold/Reydon. In addition, further land is required in Bungay and Beccles and potentially in Lowestoft, Halesworth and Southwold/Reydon. The Site Specific Allocations document will identify sites to meet these needs.

5.40 In Bungay, the need is primarily for small and medium units to enable the establishment and growth of new businesses. A mix of types is required (B1, B2 and B8) but in particular light industrial (B1). A site of up to 5 hectares would assist in meeting local needs in Bungay. Key considerations in identifying further land will be impact on the landscape and the amount and type of traffic likely to travel through the town centre.

5.41 In Beccles, there are limited opportunities but it is recommended that any mixed-use schemes should include office/workshop units. There is demand for more land in the area of Ellough/Beccles Business Park to accommodate the needs of larger users for B1, B2 and B8 use. The study revealed that all but 2 hectares of the original 20 hectare allocation is now sold or under offer. Since the study was completed, an additional 10 hectare site (as identified in the study) has been granted planning permission. Progress in developing the undeveloped areas of land at Ellough will be an important consideration in determining the need to allocate further land here. Lorry movements generated in this locality and wishing to reach the A145 going south to Ipswich and beyond have a detrimental environmental impact on Beccles town. A southern relief road of the town is needed, towards which developers should make appropriate financial contributions. Lorry movements also use the country lanes (Ellough Road) to and from the A12, thereby adversely affecting the small community of Hulver. Measures to improve the situation need to be encouraged through the Suffolk County Council Lorry Management Plan.

5.42 Since the Study, there has been additional pressure to identify further land in Halesworth, to meet local manufacturing needs of large users.

5.43 In the Southwold/Reydon area the study highlights the relatively high demand for employment land at the Fountain Way industrial estate in Reydon and recommends the retention of the existing small employment land extension in this location.

5.44 The Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] will have an important role as a strategic [BULLSHIT] employment site in addressing the future employment needs for Lowestoft, including the designation of an area for a renewable energy cluster (Policy CS08). It is expected that at least 1000 of the 5000 additional jobs will be secured in this locality. In the Lake Lothing area of Lowestoft there are substantial areas of underused land. The study recommends that approximately 35 hectares of the employment land (approx. 50%) is removed from employment use. This land could then be redeveloped, including mixed-use schemes with higher density light industrial uses and those uses that need a water frontage or port location. Some low density storage and manufacturing uses in this area may prefer to locate to employment land on the edge of the town. From a sub-regional [BULLSHIT] perspective it is likely that some of the employment land needs will be met through available land at Beacon [BULLSHIT] Park, situated between the towns of Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth in Gorleston. In accordance with Government policy, the preference for the location of office type employment uses (B1(a)) will be the town centres (Policy CS10).

5.45 Should the planning consent for the 17 ha extension of South Lowestoft Industrial Estate expire (Jun 2008), this land will be identified in the Site Specific Allocations document as an employment allocation for a range of types (B1, B2 and B8) and size of units.

Table 6 Employment land permissions and Local Plan allocations as of 31 March 2007

 

 

Commitments (Ha) as of 31 March 2007

 

 

Land with planning permission / under construction

Allocated in Local Plan 

Total 

Lowestoft area

25.33

 3.50

28.33

Beccles area

35.70

 0.00

35.70

Bungay area

1.10

 0.00

1.10

Halesworth area

1.21

 2.57

3.78

Southwold area

1.29

 0.64

1.93

District Total

64.63

 6.71

71.34 

Source: Waveney District Council monitoring

Employment Land Location Criteria
5.46 New allocations of employment land will be in or adjacent to Lowestoft and the market towns, in accordance with the settlement hierarchy. Based on an analysis of employment development over the past 5 years and possible future allocations, it is anticipated that 60% of future employment development will take place on previously developed land. The focus will be on developing sites within the towns first, followed by extensions to existing employment areas. In both cases the preference will be to develop previously developed land before greenfield. The last resort will be new greenfield employment sites on the edge of the built-up areas. There should be good access to the transport network and public transport.

5.47 Live-work units will be encouraged within the towns. In the rural areas, proposals to diversify the rural economy will be encouraged, particularly where they are located in or adjacent to the larger villages. Farm diversification proposals will be supported where they can make a long-term contribution to sustaining the agricultural enterprise as a whole and where the proposal is consistent with its rural location. 

Policy CS07 - Employment

Provision will be made to meet the East of England Plan job growth target of 5000 additional jobs in Waveney over the period 2001 to 2021. This will be partly achieved through the Site Specific Allocations, the Lake Lothing and Outer Harbour Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] and the Development Management Policies Documents. Approximately 60% of employment development (B1, B2, B8) over the plan period will be on previously developed land.

Employment sites will need to provide for a range of business needs in terms of size, location and quality. With the exception of surplus industrial land in the Lake Lothing area of Lowestoft, existing employment land will be protected, and subject to the take-up of existing planning permissions, additional land will be allocated, especially in Lowestoft, Beccles, Bungay and Halesworth.

In particular:

Lowestoft - The Lake Lothing and outer harbour area will be identified and developed as a strategic [BULLSHIT] employment site through the Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] in support of port development, employment-led regeneration and economic diversification. A shift towards the provision of a range of sizes of light industrial and business units will be encouraged, including as part of mixed-use schemes.

Bungay - A site of up to 5 ha will be identified through the Site Specific Allocations DPD for a mix of small and medium sized units (B1, B2 and B8) but in particular for light industrial (B1).

New allocations and proposals for redevelopment will be in or adjacent to Lowestoft and the market towns, in accordance with the settlement hierarchy. The focus will be on developing sites within the towns, followed by extensions to existing employment areas. The preference will be to develop previously developed land before greenfield. The last resort will be new greenfield employment sites on the edge of the built-up areas. There should be good access to the transport network and public transport. Impact on adjacent uses should be minimised.

Outside the towns proposals to diversify the rural economy will be encouraged, particularly where they are located in or adjacent to the larger villages. The development should be of a scale and character appropriate to the location and there should be good access to the transport network and public transport. Farm diversification proposals will be supported where they can make a long-term contribution to sustaining the agricultural enterprise as a whole and where the proposal is consistent with its rural location.

In conjunction with the above approach, the District Council will work with partners [BULLSHIT] to assess skills shortages in the District, to encourage inward investment and to provide business support.

Renewable Energy Cluster

Orbis Energy and Gulliver, Lowestoft

5.48 Policy GYL1 of the East of England Plan (May 2008) promotes the development of a renewable energy cluster in Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth, to utilise [BULLSHIT] existing offshore engineering skills. Lowestoft is ideally located to capitalise on the predicted increase in offshore wind turbines in the North Sea, in order to meet enhanced Government targets for offshore wind energy production by 2020. This should be focused on the Ness Point, harbour and Lake Lothing areas of Lowestoft, and should include the creation of a 'power park' based around existing renewable energy developments in the Ness Point/Wilde Street area. Companies in the renewable energy sector are already established in Waveney, making a vital contribution to the local economy and employment opportunities. Suffolk's first commercial wind turbine (known locally as Gulliver) was constructed at Ness Point in December 2004. In addition, the new OrbisEnergy centre at Ness Point will provide accommodation for more than 30 small and medium sized companies involved in offshore renewable energy, and be a centre of academic expertise.

Policy CS08 - Renewable Energy Cluster

A renewable energy cluster and 'power park' of around 8 ha will be promoted in the Lake Lothing and harbour area of central Lowestoft, especially focused on expanding existing development in the Ness Point and outer harbour area.

Knowledge Economy

5.49 One of the keys to improving employment prospects is to improve educational attainment, aspirations and skills. This is a key priority [BULLSHIT] in the Waveney Sustainable Communities [BULLSHIT] Strategy and the Waveney Prospectus. The promotion of the University Campus for Suffolk with a facility in the area will enhance [BULLSHIT] access to further and higher education and assist in improving the education and skills base in Waveney. The location of a facility in Waveney may also bring with it the associated requirements such as student accommodation.

Education
5.50 Educational needs cover all ages. One priority [BULLSHIT] action in the Waveney Sustainable Communities [BULLSHIT] Strategy was to open 8 Children's Centres by March 2008, to deliver support, advice and services to children and their parents. Most of these have been delivered through reuse of existing sites. Suffolk County Council Education has identified a need for new primary schools in Oulton and the Lake Lothing area of Lowestoft.

5.51 Suffolk County Council is currently undertaking [BULLSHIT] a reorganisation of schools in Suffolk, moving from a three-tier education system to a two-tier, of primary and secondary schools. Given the Government's proposed emphasis on increased vocational opportunities for 14 to 19 year olds and raising the age for compulsory participation in schools from 16 to 18, the opportunity is also being taken to review post-16 provision.

5.52 The review is being carried out in three phases with Lowestoft in Phase 1 (expected to be complete by 2011) and Beccles and Bungay in Phase 2. Specific proposals for Lowestoft include the need for an additional secondary school in south Lowestoft and a new centre for post-16 education. Both these proposals will ideally be accommodated through the redevelopment of existing education facilities. It is not yet known if there will be any additional land-use requirements resulting from the schools reorganisation as this is still to be determined following consultation.

Research and Development
5.53 The knowledge economy can also be promoted by developing the role of the public sector and the research and development strengths such as those in the marine industry. In 2010, Cefas (the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science) will be relocating from its established location in Pakefield to new offices shared with Waveney District Council and Suffolk County Council in the Lake Lothing area. The OrbisEnergy centre will create opportunities to expand research and development in the field of offshore renewable energy.

Policy CS09 - Knowledge Economy

Land will be identified in the Site Specific Allocations and the Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] Documents to meet the future needs of the emerging knowledge economy. This will include educational facilities and their associated uses such as student accommodation. Priority [BULLSHIT] will be given to brownfield sites with good access by public transport, walking and cycling, either in central (town centre or edge of centre) locations or well connected to existing educational / research establishments.

Retail, Leisure and Office Development

 

5.54 The retail sector is an important driver of the regional economy. In particular, Norwich is a major regional centre and one of the top ten shopping centres in the country. The East of England Plan (May 2008) states that new retail development should be located in existing centres and should be consistent in scale and character with the retail role they perform.

5.55 The East of England Plan (May 2008) sees thriving town centres as fundamental to sustainable [BULLSHIT] development, as central locations provide hubs for a range of services and facilities with good access to public transport. In addition to a range of retail uses, vibrant town centres include office use and leisure uses. Leisure uses include those relating to the evening economy such as restaurants and bars, entertainment such as cinemas and theatres plus recreation uses including bowling alleys, health and fitness.

Retail Hierarchy
5.56 Norwich attracts shoppers from a large catchment that includes the Waveney District and Great Yarmouth Borough areas. Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft town centres primarily serve their immediate catchments especially for everyday needs. Both are identified as Major Town Centres in the East of England Plan (May 2008). As the main shopping centre within Waveney District, Lowestoft town centre will be the main focus for new retail development in Waveney. A network of other centres has been identified based on their current role and priority [BULLSHIT] for new development, as illustrated below:

Figure 4 Retail hierarchy for Waveney

  1. Major Town Centre - Lowestoft
  2. Large Town Centre - Beccles
  3. Smaller Town Centres - Bungay, Halesworth, Southwold
  4. District Centres - Kirkley, Oulton Broad
  5. Local Centres - e.g. Kessingland, Westwood Avenue (Lowestoft) and others

5.57 The market towns and District Centres (Kirkley and Oulton Broad in Lowestoft), fall within the catchment of larger shopping centres and serve more localised areas. Government guidance [BULLSHIT] directs major proposals to within town and District centres in the first instance. Should no opportunities be available then sites adjoining existing centres and then elsewhere will be considered as part of a sequential approach.  

Village Shop, Barnby

5.58 Neighbourhood stores and rural shops also provide a vital part of the retail pattern of the District, serving local needs especially for those people without access to a car. Existing uses will be protected and where a need is established, new shops to meet day to day needs within local communities will be supported. A network of local centres will be identified through the Development Management Policies DPD and shown on the accompanying Proposals Map.

Retail and Leisure Needs [BULLSHIT]
5.59 A retail and leisure study was commissioned by Waveney and Great Yarmouth Councils to inform the Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT] (Aug 2006). The study concluded that there was little capacity [BULLSHIT] for further convenience shops (e.g. selling food and other day to day goods) in Waveney before 2016. Taking into account more recent permissions for neighbourhood convenience shops, there are unlikely to be any allocations for supermarkets or large food stores during this period. However, with as yet unimplemented permissions for stores in Lowestoft and Halesworth, this will be kept under review. The long term projection indicated capacity [BULLSHIT] for a total of 2,300 to 4,700 sqm net of new convenience floorspace to 2021 (based on median projections).

5.60 The retail and leisure study identified some capacity [BULLSHIT] for new comparison floorspace in the District. Taking into account new retail units in Beccles town centre that have been granted permission since the study was completed, capacity [BULLSHIT] remains for around 16,500 to 25,500 sqm net of new retail floorspace to 2021 (based on median projections). The study also recommended that Lowestoft would benefit from more evening leisure development, such as quality restaurants and bars. It is anticipated that the majority of this new retail and leisure development will be located in an extension to Lowestoft town centre, in the Lake Lothing area. Allocations will be made in the Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]. It is not considered necessary to make further major retail allocations in the Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT] at this time, although this will be kept under review. If any local retail and leisure needs [BULLSHIT] are identified these will be addressed through the Site Specific Allocations DPD. Any allocations and applications will be assessed against Policy CS10 and the criteria in PPS6.

Policy CS10 - Retail, Leisure and Office Development

The vitality and viability of all Town and District centres will be maintained and enhanced so they continue to act as the focus for a range of activities, including retail, leisure and business uses. In this respect, mixed-use schemes will be encouraged. In smaller settlements existing local services will be protected to support the sustainability of these communities. This will be achieved through:

  • identifying the main Town Centre of Lowestoft as the preference for retail, leisure and office uses followed by Beccles, Bungay, Halesworth and Southwold and the District Centres of Kirkley (London Road South) and Oulton Broad (Bridge Road), in accordance with their position in the retail hierarchy.
  • requiring new retail, leisure and office developments to be located in the existing centres wherever possible and to be of an appropriate scale and character to reflect their role and function.
  • requiring retail, leisure and office facilities outside of the defined centres to demonstrate there is a need for the development, there would be no significant adverse impact on the vitality and viability of any defined centres, the location is accessible by sustainable [BULLSHIT] means of transport and there are no sequentially preferable alternative sites available in, or at the edge of defined centres.
  • protecting existing retail, leisure and office facilities in local areas / neighbourhoods and rural villages to ensure the continued vitality and viability of these communities.

In the region of 21,000 sqm of new (comparison) retail floorspace plus associated leisure development will be located in the Lake Lothing area in an extension to Lowestoft town centre. Sites will be allocated in the Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT].

Housing

Construction, Kessingland

Housing Requirement
5.61 The East of England Plan (May 2008) requires a total of at least 5800 dwellings to be built in Waveney over the period to 2021, a rate of 290 per year. PPS3 Housing and the East of England Plan require that a 15 year supply of housing land is identified beyond the adoption of the Core Strategy. Therefore, provision will be made for approximately a further 1,200 dwellings for the period 2021 to 2025 to meet this need. To meet this commitment, the amount of land for housing will be provided through existing commitments, new housing allocations, and windfall developments (i.e. those sites which are neither commitments nor allocations and for which it is difficult to predict exactly where development will take place). The number of dwellings built over the period from 2001 is also taken into account (see Housing Trajectory [BULLSHIT] Appendix 1). Priority [BULLSHIT] will be given to brownfield sites to assist regeneration and urban renaissance. New housing allocations will be identified in the Site Specific Allocations Documents.

Table 7 Land availability position as of 31st March 2007

East of England Plan requirement 2001-2021

5800

Roll forward remaining annual average East of England Plan requirement 2021-2025 (4 x 290)

1160

Total housing requirement 2001-2025

6960

Dwellings completed 2001-2007

2346

Dwellings with planning permission

831

Dwellings under construction

277

Allocated sites that have been given planning permission between 1st April and 3rd December 2007 (including those subject to a Section 106 agreement)

932

Subtotal of dwellings already identified 2001-2007

4386

Remaining dwellings for which land is required 2007-2025

2574

Housing Distribution Strategy
5.62 The future distribution of housing within the District will be governed by government guidelines [BULLSHIT], the East of England Plan (May 2008) policies and the policy approach set out in this Core Strategy. It also takes account of an assessment of sites as set out in the Strategic [BULLSHIT] Housing Land Availability Assessment (Nov 2007).

5.63 This context points to most development taking place in Lowestoft as the largest town in the District and having a commensurate range of services and facilities, employment, public transport and opportunities for development on previously developed land. The market towns, providing the role of a focal point for the surrounding villages and rural areas, will be expected to accommodate some additional housing. As for the consideration of options for the market towns under the approach to settlement strategy, focus will be on previously developed land where the opportunities occur. This points to more growth in Beccles (with Worlingham) and Halesworth, than Bungay and Southwold (with Reydon). In addition, the environmental constraints to development in and around Bungay and Southwold are greater.

5.64 Development in the rural areas outside Lowestoft and the market towns will be focused primarily on the Larger Villages (Policy CS01). 'Physical limits' for these settlements will be defined in the Development Management Policies document. Within these 'limits' individual or small groups of dwellings on previously developed land will usually be acceptable subject to the appropriate Development Management policies. There may be some opportunities for small-scale housing development within the physical limits but where a local housing need is demonstrated, the priority [BULLSHIT] will be for affordable housing or replacement of dwellings lost to coastal erosion. If the housing need cannot be satisfied within the physical limits there may be opportunities for these specific types of housing to be located on the edge of the village.

5.65 Outside these villages, in the countryside a more restrictive approach to development will be taken. Specific exceptions to this approach could include infilling of one or two dwellings in appropriate locations, barn conversions, agricultural workers dwellings and affordable housing.

Housing Development on Previously Developed Land
5.66 The vast majority of new housing allocations and windfall sites from 2007 are anticipated to be on previously developed land, taking opportunities to redevelop brownfield sites where they occur in Lowestoft and the market towns. When all existing completions and sites with planning permission to 2007 are taken into account, more than 50% of the total amount of new housing supplied during 2001 to 2025 is expected to be on previously developed land (see Appendix 1).

Housing Provision

Lowestoft
5.67 Table 7 shows that the Waveney LDF needs to identify land to accommodate at least 2,374 dwellings from 2007 to 2025. Around 70-80% of total housing growth 2001-2025 should be in Lowestoft, (including Carlton Colville and Oulton) as the main town. To achieve the middle of this range (75%), around 2,200 of the additional homes (2007-2025) would need to be provided in this area, taking into account existing completions and sites with planning permission. The majority of these (approx 1500) will be located on previously developed land in the Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] area of central Lowestoft, with the rest likely to be accommodated on other brownfield sites within the physical limits of the town. The Waveney Strategic [BULLSHIT] Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA) shows that there are sufficient large brownfield sites in Lowestoft to accommodate this amount of housing without needing to rely on unallocated 'windfall' development.

Market Towns
5.68 The remaining dwellings should be distributed between the four market towns, leading to around 15-25% of total housing growth in the market towns. As an indicative figure, approximately 375 additional dwellings would need to be provided in the market towns between 2007 and 2025 to achieve the middle of this range (20%). The Waveney SHLAA shows that sufficient opportunities exist to accommodate at least 375 dwellings on previously developed land. This would avoid the need for greenfield allocations in the market towns and contribute towards the achievement of the regional previously developed land target of 60%. The majority of these new dwellings are likely to be located in Beccles (around 40%) and Halesworth (around 30%), where most brownfield opportunities exist. Most allocations will be made in Beccles and Halesworth.

5.69 Figures contained in the SHLAA show that a large proportion of the brownfield sites in the market towns are small sites or are otherwise unsuitable for allocation e.g. where there is an existing use on the site. A windfall allowance will need to be taken into account when planning for new housing delivery in the market towns, to avoid the need for greenfield allocations when brownfield opportunities within existing settlement boundaries are known to exist. It is anticipated that around two-thirds of future housing growth in the market towns (or up to around 250 dwellings) will come forward as windfall development. As required by PPS3, the windfall allowance will not be applied in the first 10 years of housing supply, but an average annual windfall figure of 31 dwellings per annum will be taken into account in the remaining 8 years, from 2017/18 onwards. Analysis of sites identified in the SHLAA and historic windfall figures for the past 6 years illustrate that this annual average figure is realistic.

Larger Villages
5.70 There is not anticipated to be a need to allocate further housing land in the larger villages given the current focus on development in the towns. Dwellings from existing completions and sites granted planning permission between 2001-2007 mean that around 4-5% of the total housing growth 2001 to 2021 will have taken place in the larger villages without any further permissions being granted. Windfall opportunities on previously developed land within the villages and greenfield affordable housing schemes could potentially still take place in the larger villages, commensurate with their scale and character. However, this has not been included when calculating how to meet the minimum housing targets in the East of England Plan, and could be seen as over and above this.

5.71 Table 8 and figure 5 show the anticipated distribution of the 6,960 housing requirement for Waveney. Additional unallocated 'windfall' sites are also likely to be permitted where these are in accordance with planning policies (for example redevelopment of brownfield sites currently in use, urban intensification, rural exception sites), but these have not been included when planning ahead to meet the required housing figure. The number of new houses completed each year will be monitored through the Annual Monitoring Report, and allocations will be reviewed if it becomes necessary to increase (or reduce) the amount of housing allocated in certain locations.

Table 8 Anticipated distribution of housing supply in Waveney 2001-2025 to meet the minimum RSS requirement

 

Settlement

Completions 2001-07

Dwellings with permission but not yet completed Apr 07

Allocated sites with planning permission Apr-Dec 07 or awaiting S106

Indicative estimate of allocations / market town windfall allowance dwellings 2007-20251 

Total number of dwellings provided 2001-20251

Total % of dwellings provided 2001-20251

 

Total % of dwellings provided on PDL 2001-20251 

Lowestoft + Carlton Colville + Oulton 

1491

633

800

25002

 

5124

74%

52%

Market towns

Beccles + Worlingham

280

103

66

3753

 

1408

 

 

20%

 

 

74%

 

 

Bungay

76

47

14

Halesworth

129

44

52

Southwold + Reydon

116

106

0

Larger villages

Barnby + North Cove

12

9

0

0

286

4%

42%

Blundeston

8

15

0

Corton

5

9

0

Holton

10

2

0

Kessingland

79

57

0

Wangford

10

3

0

Wrentham

59

8

0

 

Elsewhere

71

72

0

0

143

2%

29%

TOTAL

2346

1108

932

2575

6961

100%

56%

1 Indicative estimate based on middle of proposed range of total housing distribution, i.e. 75% in Lowestoft (proposed range 70-80%) and 20% in the market towns (proposed range 15-25%)

2 All of which is likely to be achieved on allocated sites

3 One-third of which is likely to be achieved on allocated sites, with the remaining two-thirds as windfall development

 

Figure 5 - Anticipated distribution of housing supply in Waveney 2001-2025 to meet the minimum RSS requirement

Figure 5 - Anticipated Distribution of housing supply in Waveney 2021-2025 to meet the minimum RSS requirement

Housing Mix
5.72 The Government wants to promote sustainable communities [BULLSHIT]. It states that what makes a community sustainable [BULLSHIT] is a well integrated mix of decent housing of different types and tenures to support a range of households of different sizes, ages and incomes. Local Development Documents are expected to achieve a broad balance of different households, translate this into a provision between affordable housing and normal market provision and address the needs of specific groups.

5.73 In association with Great Yarmouth Borough Council, the Council undertook a Housing Market Assessment, including an assessment of housing need. This will inform the Development Management Policies and Site Specific Allocations in relation to the local housing market, the types of housing needs in the District and the amount of affordable housing required. The needs of gypsies and travellers have also been assessed with other Suffolk authorities, and are addressed separately in policy CS12. Any land use approach will need to be supported by other measures to assist people in meeting their housing needs.

5.74 The Housing Market Assessment identified demographic trends towards smaller households and an aging population, and concluded that there will be substantial need for accessible and adaptable homes in the District, some with an element of care. House prices in Lowestoft almost doubled between 1996 and 2006, and affordability is a major issue across Waveney. The Housing Market Assessment found a need for 225 affordable homes each year. Whilst this total is not achievable, a target of 30% affordable housing was recommended in Waveney, 10% of which should be intermediate housing (shared ownership or low cost housing for sale or intermediate rent). The majority of identified affordable housing need (82%) was for smaller 1-2 bedroom dwellings, with some need for larger family accommodation with 3 or more bedrooms. In accordance with PPS3, appropriate thresholds and targets for affordable housing based on local needs will be set through the Development Management Policies and Site Specific Allocations Documents.

Policy CS11 - Housing

Provision will be made for 5,800 dwellings over the period 2001 to 2021. In addition, to ensure at least a 15 year supply of housing from the adoption of this Core Strategy, provision will be made for a further 1160 dwellings for the period 2021 to 2025. The distribution of housing will be broadly in accordance with the proportions indicated below:

In the region of 5,000 dwellings in Lowestoft (inc Carlton Colville and Oulton).

In the region of 1,500 dwellings in the Market towns of Beccles (inc Worlingham), Bungay, Halesworth, and Southwold/Reydon. Beccles and Halesworth will take a larger share of this growth based on their brownfield opportunities.

Up to approximately 300 dwellings will be accommodated in the larger villages. In these villages only small-scale development, commensurate with their scale and character will be allowed.

The Site Specific Allocations Document and the Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] will identify specific sites to accommodate the broad distribution of housing indicated above. A sequential approach to allocated sites and proposals for development will be taken in the following order:

  • previously developed land within the physical limits of settlements;
  • previously developed land on the edge of settlements;
  • greenfield sites within settlements may be acceptable in exceptional circumstances, in accordance with PPG17; and
  • greenfield sites on the edge of settlements.

In order to avoid greenfield allocations in the market towns, up to 250 dwellings are anticipated to be delivered on small or other unallocated windfall sites in the period 2017-2025.

Outside the larger villages, only infill development and other exceptions such as affordable housing, barn conversions, and agricultural workers dwellings to support the rural economy will be permitted. Character and form of the settlement, access to services and facilities and impact on the landscape will be important in determining proposals for infill development and affordable housing. Affordable housing will also be dependent on an identified housing need.

Development Management Policies will provide greater guidance as to how future housing development should take place. This DPD will include policies, thresholds and targets to ensure that new development delivers affordable housing and an appropriate housing mix to meet local needs.

Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation

5.75 Local Development Frameworks must consider the accommodation needs of gypsies and travellers. There is currently a national and regional shortage of authorised sites for gypsies and travellers (Circular 01/2006, PPS3, East of England Plan). Addressing this under-provision will help to improve access to services (e.g. health and education) for gypsies and travellers and reduce conflicts arising from unauthorised sites and encampments.

5.76 Gypsies and travellers are defined in Circular 01/2006 - Planning For Gypsy and Traveller Caravan Sites, as 'persons of nomadic habit of life, whatever their race or origin, including such persons who on grounds only of their own or their family's or dependants' educational or health needs or old age have ceased to travel temporarily or permanently, but excluding members of an organised group of travelling show people or circus people travelling together as such'. Government guidance [BULLSHIT] allows gypsy sites to be located in the countryside as an exception to normal policies of control, provided that other sustainability issues are addressed.

5.77 Waveney has one gypsy and traveller site providing 24 residential pitches, located in Kessingland. However, currently there are no transit pitches providing temporary accommodation within Waveney.

5.78 The Suffolk Cross-Boundary Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation Assessment was commissioned jointly by Waveney and 4 other local authorities in Suffolk to identify the local need for pitch provision. The assessment identified a need for 4 additional residential pitches within Waveney between 2006 and 2016. Four pitches have recently been constructed at an extension to the Kessingland site which will meet the anticipated need for residential pitches in the District. The assessment also estimated a need for 10 transit pitches in each of the authorities studied by 2011. Sites for transit provision will be identified through the Site Allocations DPD, having regard to the criteria set out in policy CS12.

5.79 EERA is currently carrying out a single issue review of the East of England Plan on provision for gypsies and travellers. This will address the urgent need for regional policy to assist local authorities in the East of England in identifying the appropriate number and location of gypsy and traveller caravan sites. The results of this review are anticipated to be issued in the later part of 2008. Should the need for further gypsy and traveller accommodation arise from the single issue review, additional sites will be provided in accordance with the policy below.

Policy CS12 - Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation

New sites to meet the accommodation needs of gypsies and travellers will be permitted provided that the following criteria are met:

  • The site will provide accommodation for gypsies and travellers, as defined in Circular 01/2006
  • Schools, services and shops are within easy travelling distance, preferably by foot, cycle or public transport
  • The site is (or can be) served by adequate water and sewerage connections
  • The site is not located within Flood Zones 2 or 3
  • There will be no adverse impact on the amenity of nearby residents or operations of adjoining land users
  • The impact on the character and appearance of the countryside is minimised
  • The development will not have an adverse impact on the objectives of sites designated for their biodiversity, geodiversity or landscape importance.

Tourism

Beach, Lowestoft

5.80 The tourist industry is vital to the economy of Waveney with an estimated 405,000 staying visitors and 3.6 million day visits in 2006. It is worth approximately £198 million to the local economy (2006) and supports around 10% of all jobs in the District.

5.81 The East of England Plan (May 2008) highlights the need to develop a more diverse tourism industry as a means of improving the economy and providing further employment opportunities. It promotes the development of a more diverse tourism cluster in Lowestoft, based on the town's resort and leisure role and its proximity to the Broads. The Waveney Sunrise Coast Tourism Strategy (2006) promotes a partnership approach to tourism in the District with an emphasis on promoting and developing the sustainable [BULLSHIT] tourism potential of the area. In particular, there is a need to increase the quality of the tourism offer in Lowestoft and the market towns. Measures are included to encourage visitors to stay longer and travel more widely in the District. There is also a need to extend the length of the tourism season and increase new and return visits. To facilitate [BULLSHIT] this, less seasonal forms of tourism will be encouraged in addition to traditional seaside holidays. For example, as the southern gateway to the Broads, Oulton Broad is a popular destination for boating and water-based recreation. In addition, planning permission has been granted for holiday development at Henham Hall which will provide facilities for year-round business tourism, increase the range of accommodation in the District and increase visitors to the historic park.

5.82 Tourism is often based on specific local assets, such as natural and built environments, that can be sensitive to increased development and visitor numbers, and this is acknowledged in the East of England Plan (May 2008). Tourism development should comply with the principles of sustainable [BULLSHIT] development and other Core Strategy, regional and national policies. This means that development should avoid adverse impacts on host communities and natural, built and historic environments. For example, it will not be permitted where it would damage a European site designated for its wildlife importance.

5.83 The Development Management Policies DPD will give further consideration to addressing the implications of coastal erosion on existing tourism uses along the coast, including any issues that may arise following the review of Shoreline Management Plans (see policy CS03) in locations such as Corton.

Policy CS13 - Tourism

All tourism development will be expected to contribute to the delivery of the Waveney Tourism Strategy. The District Council will work with partners [BULLSHIT] to promote and secure sustainable [BULLSHIT] tourism development. A more diverse and high quality tourism offer will be encouraged that seeks to lengthen the tourism season, increase the number of visits, provide job opportunities and sustain the tourism economy. However this growth should not be at the expense of the natural and cultural assets on which it is based.

Existing tourism uses will be protected. Redevelopment of existing sites will be encouraged where it increases the range and/or quality of tourist facilities and accommodation.

New tourist accommodation and attractions should be developed in locations that offer good connectivity with other tourist destinations and amenities, particularly by public transport, walking and cycling. New tourism development will normally be located in or close to Lowestoft and the market towns, the larger village coastal resorts of Corton and Kessingland, and other villages where local services, facilities and public transport reduce the need to travel by car. Outside of these locations new-build development will not normally be acceptable. The focus will be on the conversion of existing buildings and development that contributes to farm diversification.

Culture

5.84 The definition of Culture in the East of England Plan (May 2008) includes the arts, creative industries, the natural and built environments, events and festivals, holidays and trips, museums, archives and galleries, local cultural traditions and pursuits, sporting and recreational activities and sporting attractions. Culture is important to well-being [BULLSHIT] and quality of life and physical and mental health. It is also important for the economic prosperity of the District.

Theatre, Lowestoft

5.85 The first Cultural Strategy (2006) for Waveney seeks to promote the cultural development of the District. The main aim is 'Increased cultural activity and opportunity for leisure, which improves the lives of residents and encourages visitors'. Regeneration is seen as essential, to enable a cultural renaissance in Waveney and to ensure that cultural identity is celebrated, developed and preserved. There is also an emphasis on encouraging a sense of pride in the District, preserving the rich and diverse heritage and increasing the social and economic benefits that the development of culture can offer. Partnership working [BULLSHIT] is seen as essential to achieving the Cultural Strategy. This strategy identifies the need to establish a new museum for the District. Any land requirements will be identified through the Site Specific Allocations Document.

5.86 Events and festivals benefit residents and tourists alike. Established cultural events in Waveney include the annual Air Show, Boat Show and Sea Fayre all held on Lowestoft seafront, powerboat racing at Oulton Broad, the Gig in the Park music festival in Halesworth, outdoor concerts at Somerleyton Hall and the Latitude Festival and steam rally at Henham Park. The Cultural Strategy also recognises the benefits of public art. Opportunities to increase provision of public art will be pursued, including through developer contributions.

Open Space, Sport and Recreation
5.87 The Waveney Open Space Strategy (Dec 2007) proposes a vision [BULLSHIT] for the future of open space in the District. It has been informed by the Waveney Open Space Needs Assessment (Jun 2006) and Playing Pitch Assessment (Mar 2002). The Open Space Strategy sets locally determined standards of provision for different types of open space, and action points for addressing identified needs and deficiencies. The Council will work with partners [BULLSHIT] to help address identified deficiencies in open space in the District, including playing fields, taking into account changing trends in sports participation. Potential partners for the delivery of the Open Space Strategy include other public agencies [BULLSHIT], developers, and groups such as the Active Waveney Sports Partnership, the Waveney Play Partnership and community groups. In particular the views of young people will be sought in providing and designing play spaces.

5.88 The Open Space Strategy indicates a shortage of parks and gardens throughout the District with the exception of north Lowestoft, and particularly in south Lowestoft and the rural areas. Deficiencies in amenity greenspace [BULLSHIT] were noted everywhere except the Southwold area, particularly in north and south Lowestoft. The 18.55 ha deficiency in amenity greenspace [BULLSHIT] in north Lowestoft is being partly addressed through the provision of a 20 ha country park as part of the Woods Meadow housing planning permission in Oulton and 13.37 ha of public open space at North Denes, previously used for camping and touring caravans. North and south Lowestoft were also found to have relatively low provision of children's play facilities per child compared to other parts of the District. Natural greenspace [BULLSHIT] was only deficient in south Lowestoft, although the Strategy notes that Beccles Common and Stow Fen in Bungay are felt to be inaccessible by local people. The Strategy also identifies an increasing demand for allotments across Waveney and the need to identify additional sites close to residential areas. Bungay and south Lowestoft have the lowest levels of provision per 1000 population.

5.89 The Open Space Strategy points to a need to identify more burial land in Lowestoft and Bungay, and a crematorium in Lowestoft. At least 2 hectares of land would be needed to accommodate a crematorium with surrounding burial land. New allocations should be close to built-up areas and/or existing facilities and accessible by public transport, walking and cycling. Consideration should also be given to the suitability of the soil and surrounding environment and the impact on surrounding uses, for example from traffic generation.

Sports pitch, Beccles5.90 The Waveney Playing Pitch Assessment (2002) identified qualitative deficiencies in playing pitches across the District including Beccles, Bungay, Halesworth, Southwold and Reydon, and particularly in the Lowestoft area (including Kessingland). The assessment identified the need for an artificial turf pitch for hockey in the District (with particular reference to Halesworth), and a need for more cricket provision in Lowestoft and Bungay. It also identified a predicted shortfall of about 12 to 14 junior soccer pitches across the District, in response to national growth in demand. It may be possible to accommodate at least some of these on existing land, for example the outfield of cricket pitches. A lack of segregated changing facilities may restrict participation in some sports in Waveney, for example girl's and women's football. Whilst there is a need for higher quality tennis playing surfaces, no additional courts are needed. More recently, the Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Rugby Club have identified a need for improved rugby provision in the Lowestoft area. There is now a shortfall in athletics facilities and better quality provision for football is needed. The opportunities for addressing these needs, including through shared site provision, will be explored in the Site Specific Allocations Document.

5.91 In terms of indoor sports provision, the community have identified a need for a leisure centre, including swimming pool, in Beccles and this is recognised in the Cultural Strategy.

5.92 The Norfolk and Suffolk Broads, covered by the Broads Authority Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT], offer varied opportunities for cultural activities including water sports and water-based recreation. Sport England have identified the Norfolk and Suffolk Broads Rivers, including the River Waveney, as a national Significant Area for Sport, based on the importance of the rivers for waterskiing.

Cultural Facilities Location Criteria
5.93 Cultural facilities and opportunities for leisure are particularly important in the towns where they can be used by both the urban population and the rural areas they serve. It is therefore appropriate to apply a sequential approach to the location of most new Cultural and Leisure facilities requiring new buildings as set out in Policy CS10 on Retail, Leisure and Office Development. Whilst it is not always possible or appropriate for some types of cultural development to be located in town centres (e.g. sports centres and school playing fields), accessibility, particularly by sustainable [BULLSHIT] modes of transport, remains a key consideration.

5.94 It is likely some school sites will become surplus to requirements as a result of the Suffolk Schools Reorganisation Review. First priority [BULLSHIT] for reuse of these sites should be community use. Surplus playing fields should be protected to address existing deficiencies and increase provision.

5.95 All new development should ensure that appropriate cultural facilities are provided to meet the needs of the development, as required by Policy CS04 - Infrastructure.

Policy CS14 - Culture

In accordance with the Waveney Cultural Strategy, the District Council and its partners will protect and promote cultural facilities, activity and opportunity for leisure, including art, theatres, museums, libraries, built and natural heritage,  sport and leisure, and open spaces to improve the lives of all sectors of the community and encourage visitors. A sequential approach to the location of new development will be applied with priority [BULLSHIT] given to accessible sites in or close to Lowestoft and the Market Towns.

The community have identified a need for a new Leisure Centre (including indoor swimming pool) in Beccles. The Council will work with partners [BULLSHIT], including the Broads Authority to identify the most appropriate site. If the site is outside the Broads Authority boundary it will be identified in the Site Specific Allocations document for the Waveney LDF.

The Council will work with partners [BULLSHIT] and local communities to make provision for a new museum for Waveney and address the District's open space needs as set out in the Waveney Open Space Strategy.

Land will be identified in the Site Specific Allocations document to meet the need for burial land in Bungay and Lowestoft. At least 2 ha of land will also be identified in Lowestoft to accommodate a crematorium with surrounding burial land. New allocations should be close to built-up areas and/or existing facilities and accessible by public transport, walking and cycling. Consideration should also be given to the suitability of the soil and surrounding environment and the impact on surrounding uses.

Developers will be expected to make provision for adequate open space in association with new development and contribute towards addressing local deficiencies in amenity greenspace [BULLSHIT] and other open space provision including:

  1. Playing fields, particularly in Halesworth, Southwold/Reydon and Kessingland
  2. Children's play areas, particularly in Lowestoft
  3. Natural greenspace [BULLSHIT], particularly in south Lowestoft
  4. Parks and gardens, particularly in south Lowestoft
  5. Allotments, particularly in Bungay and south Lowestoft

Identified deficiencies will be addressed through Development Management policies and appropriate sites will be allocated in the Site Specific Allocations DPD. Developer contributions towards other cultural facilities will be sought as appropriate under policy CS04.

Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Transport

Bus Services, Beccles

5.96 The East of England Plan (May 2008) includes the regional transport strategy. The strategy is to improve accessibility to jobs, services and other activities in support of the spatial [BULLSHIT] strategy, while aiming to reduce the rate of road traffic growth, in particular the use of the car. This will assist in minimising environmental impact and contributions to climate change. This should be achieved by reducing the need to travel, changing travel behaviour towards more sustainable [BULLSHIT] modes and promoting an improved range of public transport to and from Regional Transport Nodes, including Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth. Improvements to public transport should include better interchange between bus/coach and rail networks and the integration of strategic [BULLSHIT] and local networks.  In addition, opportunities should be taken to shift freight away from roads to rail and water.

5.97 Localised improvements to encourage cycling, walking and enhance [BULLSHIT] the bridleway network are promoted. Completing the National Cycle Network in the Region by 2010 and linking with local cycle networks is also a priority [BULLSHIT] affecting Waveney. In rural areas, it is acknowledged that the private car will remain essential in many situations. However, innovative schemes to provide public transport and the delivery of services have a role in increasing accessibility, particularly for those without a car.

Strategic [BULLSHIT] and Regional Road Network
5.98 The East of England Plan (May 2008) sets out the strategic [BULLSHIT] and the regional road network. The only element of the strategic [BULLSHIT] network affecting Waveney is the stretch of the A12 from Great Yarmouth to Lowestoft. The network however does include the route of the A47 from Norwich to Great Yarmouth. Therefore the currently programmed dualling of part of the A47 from Norwich to Great Yarmouth (Blofield to North Burlingham) could improve communications between Norwich and Waveney. The ports of Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth are both identified as having a key role in the national and regional economy. The regional road and rail networks include the A12 from Lowestoft to Ipswich, the A143/146 to Norwich / Bury St Edmunds and the East Suffolk and Wherry lines to Ipswich and Norwich respectively.

5.99 Strategic [BULLSHIT] and regional road networks are expected to be the main focus for improvement and specific reference is made to improving access to Key Centres of Development and Change in support of economic and development objectives, particularly in Strategic [BULLSHIT] Employment Locations and Priority [BULLSHIT] Areas for Regeneration. Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft meet all these criteria. This is particularly important to Waveney given its geographic remoteness and poor communications network with the rest of the Region and beyond.

5.100 As part of the strategic [BULLSHIT] approach to the regeneration of Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft, the East of England Plan (May 2008) proposes the promotion of transport improvements on key transport corridors into and between the towns, together with measures to relieve congestion and improve access to regeneration opportunities.

Suffolk Local Transport Plan
5.101 The Suffolk Local Transport Plan (2006-2011) objectives are summarised in para 1.34-1.35 of this Core Strategy. It takes a more local approach towards achieving sustainable [BULLSHIT] transport, contributing to regeneration, minimising the impact of traffic and transport infrastructure and helping maintain viable communities. The Plan includes a series of interventions that affect the District, including the preparation in 2006 of a local accessibility action plan [BULLSHIT] for Waveney, to enhance [BULLSHIT] sustainable [BULLSHIT] movements. The specific priority [BULLSHIT] in Waveney is access to adult / further education and training to provide access to employment opportunities, particularly for people living in rural areas. Other interventions for Lowestoft, as the largest town in the District, relate to employer and school travel plans, reviewing the potential for park and ride, improving facilities for pedestrians and cyclists, improving integration between rail and bus services, traffic management and control systems and rail improvements on the Ipswich to Lowestoft route.

5.102 For the market towns and villages, possible interventions include the development of the rights of way network to improve accessibility for walking, cycling and horse riding, extension of the 20mph zones to rural schools, seasonal park and ride in tourism areas, encouraging sustainable [BULLSHIT] travel, minimising the impact of the private car in areas of high natural heritage value and continuing to implement the lorry management plan. The Site Specific Allocations and Development Management Policies documents will identify specific measures aimed at achieving the sustainable [BULLSHIT] transport aims and proposals in Waveney.

5.103 Improving transport accessibility in the market towns in Waveney is integral to their regeneration. In rural areas such as Waveney, the car will continue to have an important role. However, many households do not have access to a car and wherever possible opportunities to reduce reliance on the car need to be provided. A key objective of the Suffolk Bus Strategy (Mar 2006) is to assist in maintaining viable communities in market towns and villages.  An increase in public transport and demand responsive transport, particularly between the market towns, larger villages and more remote rural areas will continue to be promoted to improve rural accessibility to services and facilities.

5.104 The Suffolk Local Transport Plan includes several potential future major transport schemes affecting Waveney that are not currently funded.

  1. The North Lowestoft Access Package proposes facilities for public transport, walking and cycling in Lowestoft and the removal of through traffic from the town centre. This scheme also includes the widening of Denmark Road and completion of the northern spine road (known as phase 5), from Peto Way northwards to the A12 dual carriageway. The road improvements of this scheme have been reviewed in the light of the regeneration proposals being developed for Lowestoft. A new road to provide access to development sites south of Lake Lothing is now proposed for inclusion in the package.
  2. Improvements to the A12 between Ipswich and Lowestoft are proposed to improve journey reliability. These are likely to focus on improving the route in the area of the four villages of Farnham, Stratford St Andrew, Little Glemford and Marlesford in Suffolk Coastal District.
  3. A146 Barnby to Carlton Colville Bypass - this scheme has been identified with the objectives of providing faster and more reliable journeys from the west to the Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft sub-region, to facilitate [BULLSHIT] economic regeneration.
  4. Beccles town centre suffers from the impact of heavy traffic travelling between the Beccles Business Park/Ellough Industrial area and the A145 to Ipswich. Further employment growth is envisaged in this area and a Beccles southern relief road is proposed to address the issue and improve access to the industrial area. A definitive route has not yet been defined.
  5. Bungay suffers from traffic, particularly heavy vehicles, passing through the town centre. This is having a negative impact on the quality of life for residents and visitors and is damaging the fabric of the town. A north-south bypass could have severe environmental impacts, and therefore the County Council are exploring alternative options to relieve the town of some of its traffic impacts.
  6. East Suffolk Rail Line improvements are needed to increase the frequency of services between Lowestoft and Liverpool Street, London from a 2 hourly to an hourly service. This scheme will assist in the regeneration of the Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft sub-region and in maintaining viable communities in the market towns and villages. Passenger numbers have already risen by 16% due to the 2 hourly through train service via Ipswich and could be significantly further increased. A new passing loop at Beccles is being investigated as the potential way forward. Network Rail's Greater Anglia Route Utilisation [BULLSHIT] Strategy (Dec 2007) recommends that the scheme should be subject to further development. In particular, the impact of service and speed changes on the level crossings on the route require more detailed consideration before finalising the business case and the precise route of the loop.

5.105 In addition to the above and although not currently a programmed or funded scheme, the District Council supports the creation of a third road crossing of Lake Lothing, as an integral part of dealing with regeneration and transport problems and issues in Lowestoft. The minimum cost is likely to be £30-£40 mn.

Bus and Rail
5.106 With respect to rail, in addition to improving train services on the East Suffolk Line, the Suffolk Rail Strategy (Feb 2007) contains a long-term priority [BULLSHIT] (beyond 2011) to increase the frequency of train services on the Wherry Line (Lowestoft to Norwich). A short-term priority [BULLSHIT] (1 to 1.5 years) is to encourage use and development of rail freight facilities at Lowestoft. Both the Bus and Rail Strategies for Suffolk include a long-term proposal to work towards the creation of a bus and rail interchange at Lowestoft station.

Behavioural Change
5.107 Bringing about behavioural change to increase the use of sustainable [BULLSHIT] modes of transport is an important element of any future transport strategy in Waveney. A Lowestoft Transport Strategy (Oct 2007) is being developed which puts the emphasis on sustainable [BULLSHIT] transport infrastructure improvements, including cycle/footbridges across Lake Lothing, to be delivered through the Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]. The County and District Council are also currently working with Sustrans on a large-scale personalised travel planning project (25,000 households) in Lowestoft, to assist residents in making the shift to more sustainable [BULLSHIT] modes of transport. Integral to this approach, is the need to develop safe cycle and pedestrian ways and cycle parking facilities to encourage greater numbers of people to build physical activity into their daily lives through cycling and walking. Greater use of taxis and car pooling can also help to reduce the reliance on the private car for travel. New developments will need to make provision for safe setting down and picking up points.

5.108 Appendix 3 - Delivery Framework [BULLSHIT] provides more detail on funding, timescales and partners involved in delivering Policy CS15.

Policy CS15 - Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Transport

The District Council will work with partners [BULLSHIT] including Suffolk County Council, 1st East Urban Regeneration Company, Great Yarmouth Borough Council, public transport infrastructure providers and operators and developers to secure the necessary transport infrastructure and sustainable [BULLSHIT] transport measures to facilitate [BULLSHIT] the regeneration of Lowestoft and the market towns, support the local economy, improve access to services and facilities particularly in rural areas and minimise the impact of traffic on the environment.

Key infrastructure required includes:
a)      Beccles southern relief road
b)      Measures to reduce traffic impact in Bungay town centre

Schemes that will assist in achieving the strategy for the sub-region:
c)       Lowestoft Access project that includes completion of the northern spine road, improvement to Denmark Road and a new road giving access to development sites south of Lake Lothing.
d)       A146 Barnby to Carlton Colville Bypass
e)       East Suffolk Line - Beccles Rail Loop
f)        Transport interchange at Lowestoft Station
g)       Quality bus corridor from Lowestoft to Great Yarmouth
h)       New cycle/pedestrian crossings of Lake Lothing to increase accessibility between development sites in Lowestoft and the town's employment sites, services and facilities.

The District Council will continue to promote the creation of a third road crossing of Lake Lothing, as an integral part of dealing with transport problems and issues in Lowestoft and the sub-region. This proposal will be pursued through the Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT].

In addition, measures to make local improvements on the A12 Lowestoft to Ipswich will be pursued through lobbying to assist in securing economic benefits to Waveney. Other localised road, cycle and pedestrian improvements will also be progressed, including opportunities to deliver the proposed additions to the National Cycle Network.

Development proposals:

Development that could generate significant traffic, including goods vehicles, will only be acceptable in the most accessible locations where there are opportunities to reduce the need to travel.

Proposals for development will need to provide for travel by a choice of means of transport other than the private car, in accordance with the following hierarchy:

  • walking
  • cycling
  • public transport
  • taxis and car pooling

Development proposals that will have significant transport implications will need to be accompanied by a transport assessment and travel plan showing how car based travel to the site can be minimised.

Natural Environment

5.109 Waveney is fortunate in having a wide variety of [BULLSHIT] landscape, the Broads in the Waveney Valley, and the Suffolk Coast and Heaths in the coastal strip south of Kessingland. In addition, the District has sites of national and indeed international importance for biodiversity and geodiversity, including a range of UK Biodiversity Action Plan [BULLSHIT] priority [BULLSHIT] habitats and species. Waveney also has some areas of high quality agricultural land, protected species and a wealth of other, often small, sites that contribute to the natural quality, biodiversity and geodiversity of the District. This includes previously developed as well as greenfield sites. Previously developed land can be rich in biodiversity and provide valuable wildlife habitat. The Council will work with partners [BULLSHIT] and the community to protect and enhance [BULLSHIT] these areas and resist inappropriate development. Developers may be required to undertake [BULLSHIT] survey work to establish the natural value of sites proposed for development.

5.110 It will be important to maintain a network of habitats and wildlife corridors to facilitate [BULLSHIT] movement of wildlife populations, including to allow species to adapt to climate change.

5.111 The Council has a duty under Section 40 of the Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act (2006) to have regard to the conservation of biodiversity and geodiversity when carrying out its functions. Planning Policy Statement 9 - Biodiversity and Geological Conservation and Circular 06/05 provide policy guidance for the protection of biodiversity and geodiversity at the national level. Internationally designated sites, Sites of Special Scientific Interest, important trees and ancient woodlands are given protection from adverse impacts arising from development. Legally protected species are a material consideration in planning decisions, as are habitats and species contained in the UK and Local Biodiversity Action Plans [BULLSHIT]. Planning Policy Statement 7 - Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Development in Rural Areas sets out national policies relating to development in the countryside. Nationally designated areas including the Broads and the Suffolk Coast and Heaths Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty are given the highest level of protection in relation to landscape and scenic beauty. Presence of the best and most versatile agricultural land should be taken into account in planning decisions, and in general the countryside should be protected for its own sake.

5.112 A Landscape Character Assessment is currently being prepared with Great Yarmouth Borough Council and is due to be published in Spring 2008. The assessment will provide information on the key characteristics and sensitivities of different landscape character areas in Waveney. This will inform production of the Development Management Policies and Site Specific Allocations documents, and help guide the location of certain types of development (e.g. wind turbines) to less sensitive areas.

Policy CS16 - Natural Environment

The District Council will work with partners [BULLSHIT] such as the Suffolk Wildlife Trust, Suffolk Biodiversity Partnership, Suffolk Coast and Heaths Project, the Broads Authority and the community to protect and enhance [BULLSHIT] the natural and historic environment in the District.

Proposals for development are expected to retain and add to local distinctiveness, retain tranquillity, avoid fragmentation of habitats and seek to enhance [BULLSHIT] wildlife corridors and networks.

In addition, proposals should conserve and contribute towards the enhancement [BULLSHIT] of the landscape character, biodiversity and geodiversity of the District, including those features listed below :-

  • the visual setting of the Norfolk and Suffolk Broads
  • the Historic Parks and Gardens of Somerleyton, Henham and Belle Vue Park in Lowestoft, and their settings
  • habitats and species in the Suffolk Biodiversity Action Plan [BULLSHIT]
  • sites and features in the emerging Suffolk Geodiversity Action Plan [BULLSHIT]
  • locally recognised sites of biodiversity and geodiversity importance, including County Wildlife Sites, Local Nature Reserves and Regionally Important Geological/Geomorphological sites
  • wildlife and green corridors as identified in the biodiversity audits for Lowestoft, the market towns and Kessingland.

Built Environment

5.113 The District also has a rich built heritage with almost 1600 listed buildings, 14 Conservation Areas and areas of considerable archaeological importance. Two further Conservation Areas at Oulton Broad and Mettingham/Ellingham fall within the area of Waveney District covered by the Broads Authority. The Council will work to preserve and enhance [BULLSHIT] these areas through positive action [BULLSHIT] and through the operation of the Development Management policies. The Council will also identify buildings that are not listed but are still important nonetheless to the history and traditions of the area. A rolling programme of Conservation Area Appraisals and Management Plans are being completed for the Conservation areas. These will have an important role in making decisions on planning applications. Much of the built environment is not protected by specific designations but its character and local distinctiveness can also be important to protect from inappropriate development. 

Policy CS17 - Built and Historic Environment

The District Council will work with partners [BULLSHIT] and the community to protect and enhance [BULLSHIT] the built and historic environment in the District. Proposals for development are expected to conserve or enhance [BULLSHIT] the areas listed below :-

  • the character and setting of the following conservation areas: Lowestoft (North and South), Beccles, Bungay, Halesworth, Southwold, Southwold Harbour, Holton, Homersfield, Somerleyton, Wangford, Wissett, Wrentham, and Walberswick (part) listed buildings and locally listed buildings
  • scheduled ancient monuments, sites of archaeological interest and their settings
  • the local distinctiveness of existing non-designated built environments

In particular, proposals in conservation areas will be assessed against the relevant Conservation Area Appraisals and Management Plans.

6. Appendices

Appendix 1 Housing Trajectory [BULLSHIT]

Figure 6 View in a new window

Figure 6 Small

                                                                                    

01/02

02/03

03/04

04/05

05/06

06/07

07/08

08/09

09/10

10/11

11/12

12/13

13/14

14/15

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

19/20

20/21

21/22

22/23

23/24

24/25

Total 01- 20/25

Net completions

574

436

507

367

271

191

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2346

Dwellings under construction 31/03/2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

139

139

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

277

Dwellings with planning permission 31/03/2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

166

166

166

166

166

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

831

Woods Meadow allocation (awaiting S106)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

78

112

112

112

112

112

92

52

18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

800

Other allocations with permission or awaiting S106 Dec 2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

26

26

26

26

26

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

132

New allocated sites (Lowestoft and Market towns)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

198

198

198

198

198

167

167

167

167

167

167

167

167

2326

Windfall allowance (Market towns only)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

31

31

31

31

31

31

31

31

250

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annual total of new dwellings provided

574

436

507

367

271

191

305

305

271

305

305

336

336

310

290

250

216

198

198

198

198

198

198

198

6962

Cumulative total of new dwellings provided

574

1010

1517

1884

2155

2346

2651

2955

3226

3531

3835

4172

4508

4818

5108

5358

5574

5773

5971

6169

6367

6566

6764

6962

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annual average RSS dwelling requirement

290

290

290

290

290

290

290

290

290

290

290

290

290

290

290

290

290

290

290

290

290

290

290

290

6960

Cumulative annual average RSS dwelling requirement

290

580

870

1160

1450

1740

2030

2320

2610

2900

3190

3480

3770

4060

4350

4640

4930

5220

5510

5800

6090

6380

6670

6960

                             


Figure 7 Cumulative housing trajectory [BULLSHIT] 2001-2025

Figure 7 Cumulative housing trajectory 2001-2025


Figure 8 Anticipated amount of housing development on previously developed (or brownfield) and greenfield land in Waveney 2001-2025[2]

Figure 8 Anticipated housing development on brownfield land

2. Indicative figures based on a middle of estimated range of total housing distribution, i.e. 75% in Lowestoft (estimated range 70-80%) and 20% in the market towns (estimated range 15-25%) [back]

Appendix 2 Saved Policies

Appendix 2 Alphabetical listing of saved policies in the Adopted Waveney Local Plan (1996) and Suffolk Structure Plan (2001) policy which will be replaced by Core Strategy policies

Table 10 Saved policies to be replaced

Adopted Local Plan Policies to be replaced

Core Strategy Policies that will replace them

Policy

Subject

Policy

Subject

CF5

New Community Facilities resulting from Development Proposals

CS04

Infrastructure

CF6

Allotments

CS14

Culture

E4

Rural Diversification

CS07

Employment

E5

Industrial Development in the Open Countryside

CS07

Employment

E6

Re-use of Existing Buildings in the Countryside

CS01

Spatial [BULLSHIT] Strategy

CS07

Employment

ENV3

Development adjoining the Broads Area

CS16

Natural Environment

ENV5

Sites of Special Scientific Interest

CS16

Natural Environment

 

Regional and National policies

ENV6

County Wildlife Sites and Local Nature Reserves

CS16

Natural Environment

ENV7

Protection of Natural Features

CS16

Natural Environment

ENV8

Greenways

CS01

Spatial [BULLSHIT] Strategy

CS02

Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Design

CS14

Culture

CS16

Natural Environment

ENV13

Coastal Erosion and Flooding

CS03

Flooding and Coastal Erosion

ENV19

Foul Drainage

CS04

Infrastructure

ENV30

Historic Parks and Gardens

CS16

Natural Environment

ENV31

Ancient Monuments and other sites of National Archaeological Importance

CS17

Built and Historic Environment

ENV34

Crime Prevention

CS02

Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Design

OS1

Existing Public Open Space Protection

CS14

Culture

OS2

Sites of Recreation/Amenity Value

CS14

Culture

National policies - PPG17

S2

Visitor Related Accommodation

CS13

Tourism

CS17

Built and Historic Environment

TM12

Existing Permanent Holiday Accommodation

CS13

Tourism

TR11

Provision for Cyclists

CS02

Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Design

CS15

Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Transport

CS04

Infrastructure

TR12

Cycle Parking Facilities

CS02

Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Design

CS15

Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Transport

CS04

Infrastructure

TR13

Pedestrian Environment

CS02

Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Design

CS04

Infrastructure

TR15

Accessibility & Needs of Disabled People

CS02

Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Design

Suffolk Structure Plan Policy to be replaced

Core Strategy Policies that will replace them

T12

County Transport Network Investment

CS15

Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Transport

Appendix 3 Delivery Framework [BULLSHIT]

Appendix 3 - Delivery Framework [BULLSHIT]

The Delivery Framework [BULLSHIT] sets down the likely delivery mechanism for each policy. Many of the policies in the Core Strategy will be implemented through other Development Plan Documents such as the Site Specific Allocations, Development Management Policies Document and the Lake Lothing and Outer Harbour Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]. The Sustainable Communities [BULLSHIT] Strategy, prepared by the Local Strategic [BULLSHIT] partnership, will also have a key role, as will other strategies prepared by the Council and partners. The key agencies [BULLSHIT] and partners likely to have a role in the delivery of the policies are identified. The end of the Plan period, 2021, will in most cases be the time scale for delivery. To ensure delivery of this Core Strategy the Council has set up a corporate working group focused on delivering sustainable communities [BULLSHIT].

Significant risks to delivery are identified, and potential mitigation against the risks. The significant factors that delivery may be dependent on are highlighted. Where appropriate, contingencies are identified, setting down the course of action that will be taken should the Core Strategy policies or elements of them not be delivered as expected.

Table 11 sets down the likely infrastructure capacity [BULLSHIT] constraints that need to be addressed prior to development or as part of a phased approach to development. At the time of preparing this document the reviews of education and health are on-going, so additional provision or constraints are still to be determined.

In addition to the constraints identified below, there is a need, as a matter of priority [BULLSHIT], to address the flood risk issues in the District. In particular, flood protection and mitigation measures are of paramount importance to the delivery of regeneration in Lowestoft. To this end the Council will work with the Environment Agency, 1st East and its other partners to identify solutions and the necessary funding.

Table 11 Infrastructure Capacity [BULLSHIT] Constraints 

Settlement

Sewage Treatment Works

Foul Sewage Network

Water Supply

Education

Health

Lowestoft

Lowestoft sewage treatment works has capacity [BULLSHIT] for further development.

Major catchment issues with flooding and structural condition problems. Significant investment required throughout catchment.

In principle there should be no issues regarding supply to small housing developments, although in some cases, dependent upon location off-site mains will be required. Further information will always be required on exact location and number of properties in order to be able to comment accurately.

New secondary school and post-16 education facility needed in South Lowestoft. New primary schools may also be required in Lake Lothing area and Parkhill, Oulton to accommodate growth.

New health centre in south Lowestoft and in Oulton associated with the Woods Meadow permission.

Beccles

Worlingham sewage treatment works has limited capacity [BULLSHIT] available. Significant investment will be required prior to further development taking place. Beccles sewage treatment works may require a new flow consent for the amount of growth anticipated.

Capacity [BULLSHIT] issues identified within catchment.

In principle there should be no issues regarding supply to small housing developments, although in some cases, dependent upon location off-site mains will be required. Further information will always be required on exact location and number of properties in order to be able to comment accurately.

To be determined.

To be determined.

Bungay

Capacity [BULLSHIT] for the amount of growth anticipated.

Moderate investment required in the catchment to address flooding issues.

In principle there should be no issues regarding supply to small housing developments, although in some cases, dependent upon location off-site mains will be required. Further information will always be required on exact location and number of properties in order to be able to comment accurately. 

To be determined.

To be determined.

Halesworth

Capacity [BULLSHIT] for the amount of growth anticipated.

No significant issues identified - TBC

 

 

Southwold & Reydon

Southwold sewage treatment works has very limited capacity [BULLSHIT] available and investment would be required to accommodate further growth.

Downstream [BULLSHIT] network improvements may be required to accommodate development.

To be determined.

To be determined.

Barnby and North Cove

Worlingham sewage treatment works has limited capacity [BULLSHIT] available. Significant investment will be required prior to further development taking place.

Capacity [BULLSHIT] issues identified within catchment.

In principle there should be no issues regarding supply to small housing developments, although in some cases, dependent upon location offsite mains will be required. Issues exist regarding the upgrade of reinforcement mains to supply additional developments in Kessingland village. Further information will always be required on exact location and number of properties in order to be able to comment accurately.

To be determined.

To be determined.

Blundeston

Capacity [BULLSHIT] for further development.

Major catchment issues with flooding and structural condition problems. Significant investment required throughout catchment.

To be determined.

To be determined.

Corton

Capacity [BULLSHIT] for further development.

Downstream [BULLSHIT] network improvements may be required to accommodate development.

To be determined.

To be determined.

Holton

Capacity [BULLSHIT] for the amount of growth anticipated.

No significant issues identified.

To be determined.

To be determined.

Kessingland

The flow consent may require increasing for the amount of growth anticipated.

There are significant issues in the catchment that would need to be faddressed prior to further development taking place.

To be determined.

To be determined.

Wangford

Currently at capacity [BULLSHIT], investment will be required to accommodate further growth.

Reinforcement required.

To be determined.

To be determined.

Wrentham

Capacity [BULLSHIT] for the amount of growth anticipated.

No significant issues identified.

To be determined.

To be determined.

Source:

Anglian Water

Anglian Water

Essex & Suffolk Water

Suffolk County Education

Great Yarmouth and Waveney PCT


Table 12 Delivery Framework [BULLSHIT]
 

Policy

Timescale for delivery / Funding

Implementation Mechanism

Lead Agencies [BULLSHIT] and Partners

Dependencies

Contingencies

Risks

Mitigation

CS01 Spatial [BULLSHIT] Strategy

 

Core Strategy Policies CS02 to CS17

• Waveney District Council

• Suffolk County Council

• Local Strategic [BULLSHIT] Partnership

• Public transport infrastructure providers

Other partners taking a similar approach in their strategies and investment plans.

Review of the Core Strategy.

(See below in relation to policies CS02 - CS17)

(See below in relation to policies CS02 - CS17)

CS02 High Quality and Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Design

On-going

• Site Specific Allocations Document

• Development Management Policies Document

• Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

• Other Local Development Documents

• Development Control System

• Waveney District Council

• 1st East

• Developers / Architects

None

None

None

None

CS03 Flooding and Coastal Erosion

On-going

• Shoreline Management Plans

• Site Specific Allocations Document

• Development Management Policies Document

• Development Control fSystem

• Broads Authority

• Waveney District Council

• Great Yarmouth Borough Council

• Suffolk Coastal District Council

• Environment Agency

• Developers

 

Dependant on the accuracy of the flooding and coastal erosion modelling.

Regular review of Shoreline Management Plans and Strategic [BULLSHIT] fFood Risk Assessment.

Funding.

Climate change increases faster than predicted.

Early review of the Core Strategy.

CS04 Infrastructure

On-going

• Site Specific Allocations Document

• Development Management Policies Document

• Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

• Other Local Development Documents

• Development Control System

Community Strategy [BULLSHIT] and partner strategies

• Local Strategic [BULLSHIT] Partnership

• Service and infrastructure providers

• Waveney District Council

• Parish/Town Councils

• Local cfommunity

• Developers

• Regional, national and European funding partners

Land values being sufficiently high for developments to be viable. Other partners taking a similar approach in their strategies and investment plans.

Use open book accounting and extract community benefit according to the highest local priorities [BULLSHIT] first or waive requirement.

Low land values  particularly for commercial sites.

Require open book accounting by developers to demonstrate viability where necessary.

CS05 Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] for Lake Lothing and Outer Harbour

 

2021

• Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

• 1st East

§  Wafveney District Council

• Suffolk County Council

• Local Strategic [BULLSHIT] Partnership

• Landowners/ Developers/ Architects

• Local community

• Businesses

• Public transport infrastructure providers

• Environment Agency

Collaborative working amongst a wide group of partners, stakeholders businesses and the community.

Strategic [BULLSHIT] flood protection measures and localised flood risk solutions acceptable to the Environment Agency that allow residential development and other vulnerable uses to take place.

Wide engagement [BULLSHIT] with the community and partners in preparing the AAP.

Strategic [BULLSHIT] Housing Land Availability Assessment identifies sufficient brownfield housing sites to meet housing requirements in the short term.

Alternative is an early review of the Core Strategy to identify broad locations for greenfield sites.

Flood risk issues not resolved.

Lobby for national and regional funding to address the issue.

CS06 Community- Based Regeneration

2021

Community Strategy [BULLSHIT]

• Economic Regeneration Strategies

• Site Specific Allocations Document

• Development Management Policies Document

• Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

• Other Local Development Documents

• Parish Plans

• Development Control System

• Local community

• Parish/Town Councils

• Local Strategic [BULLSHIT] Partnership

• Waveney District Council

• Suffolk County Council

• 1st East

• EEDA

Funding and resources.

Partnership working [BULLSHIT] to reduce costs and workloads, e.g. with neighbouring parishes.

None

None

CS07 Employment

2021 to deliver the jobs growth target

• Site Specific Allocations Document

• Development Management Policies Document

• Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

• Development Control System

• Economic Regeneration Strategies

• Tourism Strategy

Community Strategy [BULLSHIT]

• Waveney District Council

• Suffolk County Council

• Local Strategic [BULLSHIT] Partnership

• 1st East

• Suffolk Development Agency

• Businesses

• Developers

Dependant on successful regeneration, including flood risk measures, particularly in the Lake Lothing and Harbour Area of Lowestoft.

Early review of the Core Strategy to identify alternative greenfield sites.

National economic problems and rise in unemployment which impacts on local economy.

Commence implementation of the policy as soon as possible, so the local economy is more diverse and sufficiently robust [BULLSHIT] to absorb the impact.

CS08 Renewable energy

2021

• Site Specific Allocations Document

• Development Management Policies Document

• Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

Community Strategy [BULLSHIT]

• Development Control System

• OrbisEnergy (Offshore Renewable Energy Centre)

• Economic Regeneration Strategies

• Waveney District Council

• Local Strategic [BULLSHIT] Partnership

• 1st East

• Developers

• Businesses

• Suffolk Development Agency

• Renewables East

 

 

 

The Renewable energy cluster is dependent on successful implementation of the Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] in Lowestoft.

Early review of the Core Strategy to identify alternative locations.

Competition from other areas of the country and abroad wanting to diversify into this sector.

Early implementation of proposals and promotion and marketing.

CS09 Knowledge economy

2021

• Site Specific Allocations Document

• Development Management Policies Document

• Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

Community Strategy [BULLSHIT]

• Development Control System

• Economic Regeneration Strategies

• Waveney District Council

• Local Strategic [BULLSHIT] Partnership

• 1st East

• University Campus Suffolk

• Developers

• Businesses

• Suffolk Development Agency

• Cefas

• Suffolk County Council, including schools

• Lowestoft College

None

None

Competition from other areas of the country and abroad wanting to diversify into this sector.

Early implementation of proposals and promotion and marketing.

CS 10 Retail, Leisure and Office Development

On-going

• Site Specific Allocations Document

• Development Management Policies Document

• Development Control System

• Cultural Strategies

• Waveney District Council

• Developers

• 1st East

Dependant on successful regeneration, including flood risk measures, particularly in the Lake Lothing and Harbour Area of Lowestoft.

Early review of the Core Strategy to identify alternative greenfield sites.

Inability to prevent the loss of further facilities and services in the rural areas.

Potential detrimental impact on Lowestoft High Street due to extension of the town centre southwards.

Explore more innovative ways of supporting and providing services in the rural areas, partly through the Development Management Policies.

Greater marketing and promotion of the historic High Street and a flexible policy approach.

CS 11 Housing

2021 to deliver the housing requirement

• Site Specific Allocations Document

• Development Management Policies Document

• Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

• Development Control System

 

• Waveney District Council

• Local Strategic [BULLSHIT] Partnership

• Housing Associations

•       Developers/Architects

• Voluntary Sector

• Suffolk County Council

• 1st East

 

 

In the medium to long term, dependent on housing development in the Lake Lothing area of Lowestoft.

Rely more heavily on windfall development/early review of the Core Strategy to identify broad locations for greenfield development.

Inability to attract developers to the area and to address flood risk issues.

On-going monitoring of housing delivery and regular updating of the Strategic [BULLSHIT] Housing Land Availability Assessment.

CS 12 Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation

On-going

• Site Specific Allocations Document

• Development Management Policies Document

• Development Control System

• Waveney District Council

• Suffolk County Council

Dependent on successful funding bids.

None

None

None

CS 13 Tourism

On-going

• Tourism Strategies

• Site Specific Allocations Document

• Development Management Policies Document

• Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

• Development Control System

• Waveney District Council

• Developers

• Tourism businesses

• Tourism Forum

• 1st East

None

None

Competition from other areas of the country and abroad.

Promotion and marketing.

CS 14 Culture

On-going

• Cultural Strategies

• Site Specific Allocations Document

• Development Management Policies Document

• Developer contributions

• Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

• Development Control System

Community Strategy [BULLSHIT]

• Waveney District Council

• Suffolk County Council

• Local Strategic [BULLSHIT] Partnership

• Arts East

• Sport England

• Active Waveney Sport s Partnership

• Local community

• Play Partnership

• Developers

• Broads Authority

• Parish and Town Councils

Funding from developers/grant aid and local community involvement

None

Lack of funding

Ensure developer contributions are made via planning applications and funding advice is provided by Waveney to local communities/groups.

CS 15 Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Transport

On-going (see details of specific schemes below)

• Local Transport Plans

• Site Specific Allocations Document

• Development Management Policies Document

• Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

• Development Control System

• Developer contributions

(See fbelow)

(See below)

(See below)

(See below)

(See below)

• East Suffolk Line -Beccles Loop

Beyond 2011 (approx £3.1mn for Waveney part of improvements)

Suffolk Local Transport Plan

• Network Rail

• Suffolk County Council

• Waveney District Council

• Suffolk Development Agency

• Community Rail Partnership

Dependent on funding from DfT and final business case.

None

None

None

• Beccles Southern Relief Road

Beyond 2016

 

(£3.7mn)

• Developer contributions from employment development

• Suffolk Local Transport Plan

• Suffolk County Council

• Waveney District Council

• Beccles Town Council

• Worlingham Parish Council

Dependent on Suffolk County Council/ Regional funding.

Promote this scheme as one scheme along with the A146 Barnby to Carlton Colville Bypass to bring the total cost of scheme above the £5mn threshold for Regional funding. 

Not allocate further employment land at Ellough/ Beccles Business Park.

None

None

Reducing traffic impact in fBungay Town Centre

Beyond 2011

• Suffolk Local Transport Plan

• Suffolk County Council

• Waveney District Council

• Bungay Town Council

Dependent on identifying a solution that does not have a significant environmental impact.

None

None

None

A146 Barnby to Carlton Colville Bypass

Beyond 2011 

(approx £7mn)

• Suffolk Local Transport Plan

• Suffolk County Council

• Waveney District Council

• Parish Councils

Dependent on Suffolk County Council/Regional funding

Could combine  this scheme with Beccles southern relief road to improve possibility of funding.

None

None

Lowestoft Access Project

Beyond 2011 

(Approx £6mn Phase 5 Northern Spine Road; improvements to Denmark Road approx £8mn; new access road south of Lake Lothing approx. £8mn)

(likely total cost £25mn including town centre accessibility improvements)

• Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

• Suffolk Local Transport Plan

• Lowestoft Transport Strategy

• Suffolk County Council

• Waveney District Council

• 1st East

Dependent on delivery by developers for south of Lake Lothing access road and County Council/Regional/Developer funding for remainder of scheme.

None

None

None

Transport interchange at Lowestoft Station

Beyond 2011 

(approx £0.5mn)

• Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

• Suffolk Local Transport Plan

• Suffolk County Council

• Waveney District Council

• 1st East

• Community Rail Partnership

• Lowestoft Quality Bus Partnership

Dependent on progress in implementing the Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] and funding from the County Council and transport providers

None

None

None

• Quality bus corridor Lowestoft to Great Yarmouth

Timescales and funding to be determined.

• Suffolk Local Transport Plan

• Suffolk County Council

• Waveney District Council

• Great Yarmouth Borough Council

• Norfolk County Council

• Lowestoft Quality Bus Partnership

Dependent on subsidy funding from County Councils and transport providers

None

None

None

• New road /cycle/pedestrian crossings of Lake Lothing

To be determined through the Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

• Lake Lothing Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

• Suffolk County Council

• Waveney District Council

• 1st East

 

To be determined in Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] and adequate funding

To be determined in Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

To be determined in Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

To be determined in Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT]

CS 16 Natural Environment

On-going

• Site Specific Allocations Document

• Development Management Policies Document

• Development Control System

• Biodiversity Action Plans [BULLSHIT]

• Geodiversity Action Plans [BULLSHIT]

• Conservation Area Management Plans

• Waveney District Council

• Broads Authority

• Suffolk Coast and Heaths Project

• Upper Waveney Valley Countryside project

• Community

• Biodiversity / Geodiversity Partnerships [BULLSHIT]

None

None

None

None

CS 17 Built and Historic Environment

On-going

• Site Specific Allocations Document

• Development Management Policies Document

• Development Control System

• Biodiversity Action Plans [BULLSHIT]

• Conservation Area Management Plans

• Waveney District Council

• Broads Authority

• Suffolk Coast and Heaths Project

• Upper Waveney Valley Countryside project

• Community

None

None

None

None

 

Appendix 4 Monitoring Framework [BULLSHIT]

When the Core Strategy is adopted it will be necessary to monitor whether the policies and proposals are being implemented as intended and how effective they are in delivering the vision [BULLSHIT] and objectives. The Monitoring Framework [BULLSHIT] includes the Core Strategy objectives, targets and a range of indicators [BULLSHIT], many of which informed the earlier identification of issues to be addressed in the District. The indicators [BULLSHIT] have been chosen to provide a guide to overall progress and will be kept under review in the light of the changing local, regional and national context. In addition, the Council is required to monitor the potential significant effects (whether positive or negative) of the policies and proposals, as identified through the Sustainability Appraisal. This monitoring framework [BULLSHIT] is set out in the accompanying Sustainability Appraisal Report. (www.waveney.gov.uk/planning/planning+policy).

The Council is required to publish the results of its monitoring in an Annual Monitoring Report. This will also include what action needs to be taken if a policy is not working or if the targets are not being met. The report must be submitted to the Secretary of State by the end of December each year, reflecting the situation at the end of the previous financial year. The results will be made public on the Council's website.

Table 13 Monitoring Framework [BULLSHIT] 

Objective

Target

Indicators [BULLSHIT]

Policies

1. Promoting the regeneration and renaissance of the Lowestoft sub-regional [BULLSHIT] area (with Great Yarmouth), in particular the central area in and around Lake Lothing and the harbour, and the market towns of Beccles, Bungay, Halesworth and Southwold

Improved perception of Lowestoft

Increasing the vitality and viability of Lowestoft and the market towns

• Housing benefit recipients
• Proportion of population with access to hospital or GP or dentist surgery
• Overall death rate by causes per 100,000 population
• Number of childcare places
• Unemployment rate
• Long-term unemployment
• Proportion of lone parents and long term ill who are economically active
• Average earnings
• Number and percentage of businesses by size (number of employees)
• Number and percentage of businesses by main industry type
• Business formation rate
• Business start up and closures
• Net change in total number of VAT registered businesses
• Number and percentage of employees by employment division

CS05 Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] for Lake Lothing and the Outer Harbour
CS06 Community - Based Regeneration
CS08 Renewable Energy Cluster
CS09 Knowledge Economy

 

2. Where appropriate, achieving social and economic regeneration of the most deprived wards in Waveney through a community based approach

Reduce the proportion of the population (20%) who live in wards in Waveney defined as the most deprived 25% in the country

• Proportion of the population who live in wards that rank within the most deprived 10% and 25% of wards in the country
• Number of Parish Plans adopted
• Plus indicators [BULLSHIT] for Objective 1 above

CS06 Community - Based Regeneration

3. Improving the health of the population and in particular reducing health inequalities [BULLSHIT]

Reducing health inequalities [BULLSHIT]

Reduce mortality rates from heart disease, strokes and related diseases by 40% in people under 75 (LAA)

Increase the Disability Adjusted Life years in people who are overweight or obese (LAA)

• Proportion of population with access to hospital or GP or dentist surgery
• Overall death rate by causes per 100,000 population
• Life expectancy
• Proportion of journeys to work on foot or by cycle
• How do children travel to school
• Obesity in the population
• Change in amount of accessible natural green space
• Change in provision of open space
• % of footpaths and other rights of way which are easy to use by members of the public

CS02 High Quality and Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Design
CS04 Infrastructure
CS14 Culture
CS15 Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Transport

4. Addressing low educational achievement and aspiration

Improve the skills and education levels of the local population

• % of year 11 pupils gaining 5+ A*-C grades at GCSE
• Average point score per student at A and AS level
• Proportion of the population with no qualifications
• Proportion of the population with NVQ level 4 or higher

CS09 Knowledge Economy

5. Reducing rates of crime and fear of crime

Reduce the number of recorded incidents of anti-social behaviour

Reduce crime rates

• Recorded crime per 1000 population
• Domestic burglary rate per 1000 population
• Violent crime rate per 1000 population
• Fear of Crime

CS02 High Quality and Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Design
CS04 Infrastructure
CS05 Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] for Lake Lothing and the Outer Harbour

6. Promoting balanced and mixed communities through housing provision and in particular addressing the need for affordable housing

Deliver an average of 290 dwellings per annum including a mix that meets the needs of the community including a minimum of 30% of affordable housing.

• Homelessness
• Housing Stock
• Housing Land Availability
• Affordable housing
• Special needs housing
• House types and sizes
• Average property price to income ratio
• Percentage of unfit dwellings
• Number of vacant dwellings

CS05 Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] for Lake Lothing and the Outer Harbour
CS11 Housing
CS12 Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation

7. Achieving more sustainable communities [BULLSHIT] by ensuring facilities and services are commensurate with development

 

Increase the proportion of the population with access to key local facilities

• Percentage of new residential development within 30 minutes public transport time of a GP, hospital, primary and secondary school, employment and a major health centre
• Number of childcare places
• % of residents who are happy with their neighbourhood
• New retail floorspace in town centres
• Change in provision of open space

CS04 Infrastructure
CS05 Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] for Lake Lothing and the Outer Harbour

 

 

8. Improving access to services and facilities, especially for those people living in rural areas

Improve access to services and facilities for those living in rural areas

• Percentage of rural population living in parishes which have a food shop or general store, post office, pub, primary school and meeting place
• Distance to key services
• % of journeys to work undertaken [BULLSHIT] by sustainable [BULLSHIT] modes
• % of school children travelling to school by sustainable [BULLSHIT] modes
• New retail floorspace in town centres
• New cultural facilities in town centres

CS02 High Quality and Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Design
CS04 Infrastructure
CS10 Retail, Leisure and Office Development
CS11 Housing
CS12 Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation
CS13 Tourism
CS14 Culture
CS15 Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Transport

9. Securing schemes of high quality design which enhance [BULLSHIT] the environment and reflect the character of the District

High quality living and working environments

• % of residents who are happy with their neighbourhood
• Fear of Crime
• Number of domestic noise complaints
• Dwellings per hectare of net developable area
• Water consumption
• Tonnage/proportion of household (and municipal) waste recycled, composted and landfilled
• % of journeys to work undertaken [BULLSHIT] by sustainable [BULLSHIT] modes
• % of school children travelling to school by sustainable [BULLSHIT] modes
• Car parking standards
• Consumption of electricity - domestic use per consumer and total commercial/industrial use
• Consumption of gas - domestic use per consumer and total commercial/industrial use
• Energy efficiency of homes
• Number of planning applications refused for reasons due to poor design

CS02 High Quality and Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Design
CS05 Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] for Lake Lothing and the Outer Harbour

 

10. Meeting the jobs growth target for the District

5000 additional jobs by 2021

• Number and percentage of employees by employment division
• Unemployment rate
• Long-term unemployment
• Proportion of lone parents and long term ill who are economically active
• Average earnings
• Number and percentage of businesses by size (number of employees)
• Number and percentage of businesses by main industry type
• Business formation rate
• Business start up and closures
• Net change in total number of VAT registered businesses

CS05 Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] for Lake Lothing and the Outer Harbour
CS07 Employment
CS08 Renewable energy cluster
CS09 Knowledge economy
CS10 Retail, Leisure and Office Development
CS13 Tourism

11. Developing the renewable energy and educational sectors

Increase the number of jobs in the renewable energy and educational sectors

• Number and percentage of employees by employment division

CS08 Renewable energy cluster
CS09 Knowledge economy

12. Promoting sustainable [BULLSHIT] tourism and the cultural development of the District

Increase the economic benefits of tourism in a sustainable [BULLSHIT] way

Increase participation in cultural activities

• Number and percentage employed in tourism
• Number of visitors to Waveney
• Number of visits to/uses of Council funded or part-funded museums per 1000 population
• Change in amount of open space (including children's play space, outdoor play space and accessible natural green space)

CS10 Retail, Leisure and Office Development
CS13 Tourism
CS14 Culture

13. Supporting our town centres as sustainable [BULLSHIT] locations for a mix of uses

Increase the vitality and viability of town centres

• % of town centre units with A1 shop uses
• Vacant units in town centres
• New retail floorspace in town centres
• New cultural facilities in town centres

CS10 Retail, Leisure and Office Development
CS14 Culture

 

14. Making the most efficient use of land and giving priority [BULLSHIT] to the redevelopment of previously used land

Achieve a target of 60% of development on previously developed land (RSS)

• Dwellings per hectare of net developable area
• Number and percentage of new dwellings completed on previously developed land
• Number and percentage of existing housing commitments on previously developed land
• Amount and percentage of new employment floorspace on previously developed land
• Number of vacant dwellings
• No. and area of potential and declared contaminated sites returned to beneficial use

CS05 Area Action Plan [BULLSHIT] for Lake Lothing and the Outer Harbour
CS07 Employment
CS11 Housing

15. Minimising the impact of climate change

Increase the energy efficiency of homes

Increase the proportion of energy used from renewable sources to 10% by 2010 and 17% by 2020 (excluding offshore wind) (RSS)

Minimise the risk of flooding and coastal erosion

• Installed electricity generating capacity [BULLSHIT] using renewable energy
• Consumption of electricity - domestic use per consumer and total commercial/industrial use
• Consumption of gas - domestic use per consumer and total commercial/industrial use
• Carbon dioxide emissions
• Flood Risk - planning applications approved against Environment Agency advice
• Properties at risk of flooding
• Developments refused because of coastal erosion
• Incidence of flood watches and warnings

CS02 High Quality and Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Design
CS03 Flooding and Coastal Erosion

16. Achieving sustainable [BULLSHIT] transport, and in particular increasing cycling, walking and use of public transport and so reducing reliance on the car for travel

Increase the proportion of journeys undertaken [BULLSHIT] by sustainable [BULLSHIT] modes

• Traffic volumes in key locations
• % of all new residential development taking place in major towns, other towns and elsewhere
• Distance to key services
• % of journeys to work undertaken [BULLSHIT] by sustainable [BULLSHIT] modes
• % of school children travelling to school by sustainable [BULLSHIT] modes
• Car parking standards

CS02 High Quality and Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Design
CS04 Infrastructure
CS10 Retail, Leisure and Office Development
CS11 Housing
CS12 Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation
CS 13 Tourism
CS 14 Culture
CS 15 Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Transport

17. Conserving and enhancing [BULLSHIT] the natural, built and historic environment

No loss in number and area of designated nature conservation sites

Ensure that character areas in Suffolk preserve their distinctive and historic features

Ensure that 50% of the biodiversity Action Plan [BULLSHIT] targets are completed and 85% in progress by 2008 (LAA)

Protection and enhancement [BULLSHIT] of the built and historic environment

 

• Water quality in rivers
• Groundwater quality
• Water quality in estuaries
• Bathing water quality
• Number of air quality management areas and dwellings affected
• Change in number and area of designated nature conservation sites
• Reported condition of SSSIs
• Achievement of habitat action plan [BULLSHIT] targets
• Achievement of species action plan [BULLSHIT] targets
• Achievement of geodiversity action plan [BULLSHIT] targets
• Allocations on Best and Most Versatile agricultural land
• Number and percentage of new dwellings completed on greenfield land
• Properties at risk of flooding
• Flood Risk - planning applications approved against Environment Agency advice
• Developments refused because of risk of coastal erosion
• Number of listed buildings and buildings at risk
• Number and area of Conservation Areas and Article 4 Directions
• Number of Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs) damaged as a result of development
• Number of applications affecting no known archaeological site but judged of high potential and approved with conditions requiring prior excavation or recording during development

CS02 High Quality and Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Design
CS03 Flooding and Coastal Erosion
CS16 Natural Environment
CS17 Built and Historic Environment

 

 

Appendix 5 Glossary

Affordable Housing - Housing that is provided, with subsidy, for people who are unable to resolve their housing needs in the local private sector market because of the relationship between housing costs and incomes. (Housing Needs Survey, 2000).

Annual Monitoring Report (AMR) - it is a requirement of the Planning Act for local planning authorities to monitor and review progress towards the delivery of the local development documents. Progress is set down in an Annual Monitoring Report which has to be prepared by the December following the end of the previous financial year.

Appropriate Assessment (AA) - The assessment of the effects of a plan or project on European sites of wildlife importance (SACs, SPAs and Ramsar sites - known collectively as the Natura 2000 network). This process is a requirement of the Habitats Directive.

Area Action Plans [BULLSHIT] - These are used to provide a planning framework [BULLSHIT] for areas of change or conservation. They are part of the Development Plan.

Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) - Environmentally sensitive land designated under the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949 for its special landscape value. The Suffolk Coast and Heaths AONB was confirmed in 1970 by the Countryside Commission to protect the high landscape quality of the area for future generations [BULLSHIT]. Suffolk Coast and Heaths is one of the 41 AONBs which cover 15% of England and Wales.

(The) Broads - This area is equivalent in status to the Broads National Park. Under the Norfolk and Suffolk Broads Act 1998 the Broads Authority is the Local Planning Authority for the area. Its remit is to protect the natural beauty and promote public enjoyment of the area.

Brownfield Land - See previously developed land.

Community Strategy [BULLSHIT] - This is a requirement of the Local Government Act 2000. The Strategy aims to improve the economic, environmental and social well-being [BULLSHIT] of the area. Through the preparation of the Community Strategy [BULLSHIT] the local authority is expected to co-ordinate the activities of other public, private and voluntary and community bodies. Responsibility for the preparation of the Strategy may be passed to the Local Strategic [BULLSHIT] Partnership. This group consists of a partnership of service providers, the private sector and voluntary and community groups. The intention is that local needs will be met in a co-ordinated and "joined up [BULLSHIT]" way.

Conservation Area - An area, designated by a local authority, of special architectural or historic interest within towns and villages, which has been given special status to ensure its protection and enhancement [BULLSHIT].

County Wildlife Site - Areas of county-wide wildlife interest as defined using the following criteria:

  • 'Woodland sites are selected using a number of criteria; ancient status, well developed structure and diverse ground flora;
  • Grasslands are selected on the basis of unimproved status, floral diversity and presence of rarities;
  • Other habitats which are regionally or nationally scarce, e.g. heathland, vegetable shingle or open water are also represented;
  • Any sites which support a population of one or more species listed in Schedule 5 or 8 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act or the Red Data book are included.'

Taken from 'A Register of County Wildlife Sites in Suffolk' (1991 and updates), compiled by Suffolk Wildlife Trust and Suffolk County Council.

Decentralised Energy Supply - Energy supply from local renewable and local low-carbon sources (ie on-site and near-site, but not remote off-site) usually on a relatively small scale. Decentralised energy is a broad term used to denote a diverse range of technologies, including micro-renewables, which can locally serve an individual building, development or wider community and includes heating and cooling energy.

Design and Access Statement - A statement accompanying a planning permission that lays out the design principles on which a development proposal is based. They should demonstrate that the applicant has thought about how everyone, including disabled people, older people and very young children, will be able to use the development.

Development - Defined in Section 55 (1) of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 as 'the carrying out of building, engineering, mining and other operations in, on, over or under land, or the making of any material change in the use of any buildings or land'.

Development Management Policies - These are likely to be criteria based policies which will be applied to ensure that all development meets the overall vision [BULLSHIT] and strategic [BULLSHIT] policies set out in the Core Strategy. To a greater or lesser extent these polices will need to be taken into account in the determination of the majority of planning applications. The development management policies form part of the Development Plan.

East of England Regional Assembly - The East of England Regional Assembly (EERA) consists of a partnership of elected representatives from 54 local authorities in the East of England and appointed representatives from social, economic and environmental interests (Community Stakeholders). It exists to promote the economic, social and environmental well-being [BULLSHIT] of the region. 

Economic Development - Development that creates new, or safeguards existing jobs.

Geodiversity - The natural diversity of geological features (rocks, minerals, fossils and structures), geomorphological features (landforms and processes) and soil features that make up the landscape. This includes their assemblages, relationships,  properties, interpretations and systems.

Greenfield - Land which has not been previously developed i.e. fields, woods, meadows, or land that has no recent history of development.

Heritage (built and architectural) - A term used to refer to the historical, architectural and archaeological features, buildings and monuments that are of local, regional or national interest.

Heritage Coast - An area of coastline protected and promoted by the Countryside Agency in association with local authorities for the enjoyment of the coast whilst protecting its natural beauty, nationally important wildlife and landscape features and improving the quality of inshore waters and beaches.

Listed Building - A building or structure designated by the Secretary of State for the Department of Culture, Media, and Sport as being of special architectural or historical interest.

Local Development Documents - The collective term used in the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 for Development Plan documents, Supplementary Planning Documents and the Statement of Community Involvement, Local Development Scheme and the Annual Monitoring Report.

Local Plans - these were documents which set out local planning policy regime for the local authority area. They included the allocation of land for specific purposes as well as policies to control development. They formed part of the development plan alongside the Structure Plan, but have now been superseded.

Mixed Use Development - A term used to refer to a variety of types of development on a particular site.

Open Space - Covers a broad range of [BULLSHIT] open spaces as defined in the annex to PPG17: Planning for Open Space, Sport and Recreation (2002).

Other Rural Settlements - According to the East of England Plan (May 2008), the main challenges [BULLSHIT] of these other rural settlements are in securing small scale employment opportunities, supporting the needs of agriculture, improving public transport access to higher order centres, providing affordable housing for local needs and supporting the sustainability of local services as identified in community led appraisals.

Planning Policy Guidance Note (PPG) - National policy guidelines [BULLSHIT] issued by the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM) on a range of subjects affecting the use and development of land.

Planning Policy Statements (PPS) - Statements of the government's national policies on a range of topics. Now issued by the Department for Communities and Local Government (CLG) and formerly by the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM).

PPS1 - Delivering Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Development
        - Supplement to PPS1 Planning and Climate Change
PPG2 - Green belts
PPS3 - Housing
PPG4 - Industrial, commercial development and small firms
PPG5 - Simplified Planning Zones
PPS6 - Planning for Town Centres
PPS7 - Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Development in Rural Areas
PPG8 - Telecommunications
PPS9 - Biodiversity and Geological Conservation
PPS10 - Planning for Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Waste Management
PPS11 - Regional Spatial [BULLSHIT] Strategies
PPS12 - Local Development Frameworks
PPG13 - Transport
PPG14 - Development on unstable land
PPG15 - Planning and the historic environment
PPG16 - Archaeology and planning
PPG17 - Planning for Open Space, Sport and Recreation
PPG18 - Enforcing planning control
PPG19 - Outdoor Advertisement Control
PPG20 - Coastal planning
PPG21 - Tourism
PPS22 - Renewable energy
PPS23 - Planning and Pollution Control
PPG24 - Planning and Noise
PPS25 - Development and Flood Risk

Previously Developed Land (PDL) - Previously-developed land is that that which is or was occupied by a permanent structure, including the curtilage of the developed land and any associated fixed surface infrastructure. The definition includes defence buildings but excludes land that is or has been occupied by agricultural or forestry buildings; land that has been developed for minerals extraction or waste disposal by landfill purposes where provision has been made for restoration through development control procedures; land in built-up areas such as parks, recreation grounds, and allotments which, although it may feature paths, pavilions and other buildings, has not previously been developed; land that was previously developed but where the remains of the permanent structure of fixed surface structure have blended into the landscape in the process of [BULLSHIT] time (to the extent that it can reasonably be considered as part of the natural surroundings). There is no resumption that land that is previously developed is necessarily suitable for housing development nor that the whole of the curtilage should be developed. (Source: PPS3 Housing)

Proposals Maps - Ordnance Survey maps which identify the areas to which policies and proposals in the development plan documents relate.

Ramsar sites - Wetlands of global importance, listed under the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance (signed in Ramsar, Iran).

Regional Spatial [BULLSHIT] Strategies - These set out the region's policies in relation to the development and use of land. It forms part of the statutory development plan. "Spatial [BULLSHIT] planning" here means taking a broader remit than land use planning. It includes taking into account the environmental, social and economic implications of land use. It requires for example the need to have regard to the strategies and plans of a wide range of [BULLSHIT] different bodies and agencies [BULLSHIT].

Regeneration - Regeneration centres on the physical development of land, buildings and new transport systems. It also seeks to capture and maximise benefits for the people through economic and social regeneration in terms of skills, social and economic inclusion, prosperity, education, housing, health, community development and the environment. It is closely aligned to neighbourhood renewal.

Regionally Important Geological/Geomorphological Sites (RIGS) - Sites of regional and local importance for geodiversity. RIGS may be designated for their value to Earth science or to Earth heritage in general including as cultural, educational, historical and aesthetic resources.

Renewable & Low Carbon Energy - Includes energy for heating and cooling as well as generating electricity. Renewable energy covers those energy flows that occur naturally and repeatedly in the environment - from the wind, the fall of water, the movement of the oceans, from the sun and also from biomass. Low-carbon technologies are those that can help reduce carbon emissions. Renewable and/or low-carbon energy supplies include, but not exclusively, those from biomass and energy crops; CHP/CCHP (and micro-CHP); waste heat that would otherwise be generated directly or indirectly from fossil fuel; energy-from-waste; ground source heating and cooling; hydro; solar thermal and photovoltaic generation; wind generation.

Site Specific Allocations - The allocation of sites for specific or mixed uses. Policies will identify any specific requirements for the site. The allocations form part of the Development Plan.

Special Areas of Conservation (SACs) - Sites of European importance for nature conservation designated under the Conservation of Natural Habitats and Wild Flora and Fauna Directive.

Special Protection Areas (SPAs) - Sites of European importance for nature conservation designated under the Conservation of Wild Birds Directive.

Statement of Community Involvement - This sets out the methods local authorities will use to involve local communities in the preparation of Local Development Documents and development control decisions. The Statement is not part of the Development Plan but it is subject to independent examination.

Structure Plans - These were county wide strategic [BULLSHIT] planning documents. They formed part of the development plan alongside Local Plans, but have now been superseded.

Suffolk Biodiversity Partnership - The partnership comprises a range of governmental and non-governmental organisations working together [BULLSHIT] to provide a sound base of countywide ecological data, formulate county level Biodiversity Action Plans [BULLSHIT], co-ordinate better protection for habitats and species, raise awareness of Suffolk's biodiversity and influence plans and strategies.

Supplementary Planning Documents - These provide additional information about a policy in a development Plan document e.g. a development brief  for a specific site. They do not form part of the Development Plan.

Sustainability Appraisal - A tool for appraising policies to ensure that they reflect sustainable [BULLSHIT] development objectives. An Appraisal is required in the legislation for all development plan documents. The Government has defined wide ranging objectives for sustainable [BULLSHIT] development as including: social progress that meets the needs of everyone, effective protection of the environment, prudent use of natural resources and the maintenance of high and stable levels of economic growth and employment. Thus we can see that sustainable [BULLSHIT] development includes economic and social influences. The Sustainable [BULLSHIT] Appraisal process takes into account the Strategic [BULLSHIT] Environmental Assessment required by the EU.

Tests of Soundness - Statutory Local Development Documents are subject to an Examination in Public by an Inspector appointed by the Secretary of State. The purpose of the Examination is to assess whether the document is 'sound'. This means that those who wish to make a representation seeking a change to the document will need to show how that document is unsound and what needs to be done to make it sound. In order to assess this, the Inspector will assess the document against certain 'Tests of Soundness'. The purpose is to ensure that the whole plan is 'sound' in relation to all the legal and policy criteria it has to meet.

Town and Country Planning Regulations 2004 - These are the Regulations which govern the preparation of the Local Development Framework [BULLSHIT] Documents.

Underused Land - Previously developed land that is in use but could be used or developed at a higher density or intensity.

Urban Regeneration Company (URC) - A private company set up specifically to promote the regeneration of a particular geographical area. Such companies are designated by the Office of Deputy Prime Minister and the Department of Trade and Industry. Representatives from the local authorities, community and private sector make up a Board of Directors. The URC will appoint its own staff who will deliver a masterplan [BULLSHIT] for the area.